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WFP's 4 Messages For Rio+20

A woman farmer receiving WFP food assistance in Ethiopia. To find out more about how WFP is working towards the goals of Rio+20, visit our special Rio+20 Page.

(Copyright: WFP/Mario Di Bari)

This week, world leaders meet with representatives of the private sector, NGOS and other groups in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, to map out ways to make the world safer, fairer, greener and more prosperous. One of the challenges is how to feed a world population expected to reach 9 billion by 2050, and in fact ‘Food’ is one of the seven key priorities that the Rio+20 summit will be focusing on, as it defines ‘the future we want’.

But at WFP we believe that defeating hunger is more than just a key goal for Rio+20 and the discussions it will host on sustainable development. We think hunger actually underpins the whole debate about sustainable development: we can’t achieve ‘the future we want’, without first dealing with hunger.

These are our 4 messages for anyone attending Rio+20 or concerned about the issues it aims to address.

Investing In Women

Women are at the heart of global food and nutrition security. Investing in women’s potential as producers, procurers and providers of food is vital for food security and sustainable development. Learn more

To find out more about how WFP is working towards sustainability and the goals of Rio+20, visit our special Rio+20 Page 

1. Focus on hunger

Sustainable development is possible only if we really get to grips with hunger and malnutrition. People cannot pull themselves out of poverty if they are hungry. Learn more
 

2. Prioritise food/nutrition on Rio agenda 

Rio+20 must put food and nutrition security at the heart of the discussion about sustainable development after 2015. It must also promote new partnerships for ending hunger, especially with the private sector.
 

3. Safety nets are vital

In order for the most vulnerable people to escape poverty, we need ‘safety nets‘ – programmes which ensure they can get food even when times get tough. Examples: school meals and food-for-work programmes.
 

4. Hunger is solvable 

Hunger is in fact the world’s greatest solvable problem and WFP is addressing it on multiple fronts. By solving it we are making communities more resilient to future shocks. Learn more