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Nepal: Sky Is The Limit For School Meals Girl

Nim Doma Sherpa climbed to the top of Mount Everest in 2008 and is now leading a group of African and Asian women on a mission to climb the highest peaks on all seven continents. Photo by kind courtesy of Nim Doma Sherpa

Nim Doma Sherpa, who became the first WFP school meals recipient to climb Everest, is now preparing to climb Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania next year as part of her team’s mission to reach the highest peak on all the seven continents. She will be joined by six Nepali and three African women climbers and will be highlighting the importance of girls’ education around the world.

KATHMANDU – Nim Doma Sherpa, who became the first WFP school meals recipient to climb Everest, is now preparing to climb Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania next year as part of her team’s mission to reach the highest peak on all the seven continents.

In Tanzania, she will be joined by six Nepali and three African women climbers and will push for the summit of the 5,897-metre summit, the rooftop of Africa. The expedition is scheduled for March 1-7, 2013 - coinciding with International Women’s Day.

“I am really excited," said Nim Doma. "We are on the seven summits mission and have so far climbed in three continents. Kilimanjaro will be our fourth summit and that is really exciting."

Nim Doma and her fellow climbers will be highlighting the importance of girls’ education and she is keen to meet her African climbing counterparts.

“Although we (Tanzania and Nepal) are geographically apart and culturally very different, women, especially young girls face similar problems and discrimination is a part of life in both countries,” she said. “Tanzania is a developing country like Nepal. Their culture and tradition is new to us and I am eager to learn and interact with local people.”

When they are not climbing, Nim Doma and her team often visit schools and spend time with children to raise awareness about the importance of education and share their experiences. This time they will be doing the same with their African climbing colleagues, visiting rural schools in Tanzania.
 
Living a dream life
Born and raised in the foothills of the Himalayas, Nim Doma has always loved being adventurous. Now 21, the former WFP school meals recipient said she had never imagined getting so far at such a young age.
 
“The dream is still on and so is the struggle but I’m very happy with where I’m today. It's amazing to realize that dreams do come true. And that is what we like to share with young people, particularly girls, that your dreams can indeed come true with hard work and dedication,” she said.
 
“I feel closely connected to WFP from the days of my childhood to the present day. If you look back at my life, WFP has been like a guardian to me and my team.  I feel great about it. WFP is doing a great thing by providing school meals. I don't know what my life would have become without that.”
 
At the age of 17, Nim Doma became the youngest member of the “First Inclusive Women’s Sagarmatha Expedition” – the WFP-supported team, that made mountaineering history after all 10 female Nepali members reached the highest point on earth in May 2008. Since then, the team has successfully climbed Mt. Kosicuszko in Australia and Mt. Elbrus in Europe.