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For Truvia staff, A Visit to Bolivia Meant Going Back to School

For Truvia staff, A Visit to Bolivia Meant Going Back to School 1

Abby Heidemann and Matthew Jacobs, TRUVIA delegates, look at their company’s logo on billboard, which is always visible to visitors and local people on the road to Kalasamana community. The billboard tells visitors who finances and cooperates with the sustainable school feeding programme and the fuel-efficient stoves in the municipality of Poroma, Chuquisaca.  

For Truvia staff, A Visit to Bolivia Meant Going Back to School 2

Abby and Matthew walk a couple of kilometers because several landslides block the road leading to the Kalasamana School. Every day Bolivian children in this region and other parts of the country have to walk long distances to go to class and also face the same difficulties the visitors dealt with during their journey. 

For Truvia staff, A Visit to Bolivia Meant Going Back to School 3

Matthew greets some school girls when he arrives at the school of Kalasamana. Children are somewhat shy, since their community is away from other towns, the road has collapsed, and so they all have little contact with the outside world.

For Truvia staff, A Visit to Bolivia Meant Going Back to School 4

Abby talks with two kids from the multigrade school of Kalasamana. At a multigrade school, one teacher is in charge of two or more classes within the same classroom. 

For Truvia staff, A Visit to Bolivia Meant Going Back to School 5

Abby helps a mother with the distribution of school breakfast. That morning, boys and girls from the school of Kalasamana had “api” for breakfast, which is a hot beverage made out of purple corn flour and it is eaten along with bread. 

For Truvia staff, A Visit to Bolivia Meant Going Back to School 6

Abby assists to a school class in Kalasamana. The girls in the background are on fifth grade and they wait for their teacher to finish giving homework instructions to children who attend classes at lower grades. 

For Truvia staff, A Visit to Bolivia Meant Going Back to School 7

A group of children from the Kalasamana School watch the video produced by TRUVIA in 2012 about their dreams and goals and how they want to pursue a profession that will allow them to overcome poverty. 

For Truvia staff, A Visit to Bolivia Meant Going Back to School 8

Children watch the video produced by TRUVIA and they recognize themselves in the screen. Their story has been told to the world and they are the lead actors of their story.

For Truvia staff, A Visit to Bolivia Meant Going Back to School 9

Children from fifth grade watch the Truvia video which was recorded in their mother tongue, Quechua, so they understand everything perfectly. 

For Truvia staff, A Visit to Bolivia Meant Going Back to School 10

Abby and Matthew play with the kids during the recess. This time, they were wolves which were catching the sheeps, who were the children of Kalasamana. 

For Truvia staff, A Visit to Bolivia Meant Going Back to School 11

Matthew brought a gift, a soccer ball, to the children of the Kalasamana School. Children played a soccer match with the visitors during recess.

For Truvia staff, A Visit to Bolivia Meant Going Back to School 12

During their field trip, the Truvia visitors also came to some of the children’s parents home. At Dionisio’s house, in the community of Irucota, Abby and Matthew tasted a delicious soup of wheat and potatoes. It helped them fight off the intense Andean cold.  

For Truvia staff, A Visit to Bolivia Meant Going Back to School 13

School girls from the community of Irucota received Abby very effusively upon her arrival. 

They came to Bolivia to visit schools supported by Truvia, but Abby Heidemann and Matthew Jacobs also sat in class and played soccer during recess, which brought memories of their school days. Before arriving at the school, they took a dirt road which leads to Kalasamana, in the municipality of Poroma, but it was blocked by a landslide. Unable to drive through, the two had to walk a couple of miles, as children do every day, in order to reach their destination.