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Official statements announcing key developments in WFP operations and activities.
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643769
10/25/2014 - 12:26

UNHAS, managed by the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), dispatched the special flight from Liberia’s capital Monrovia and it landed in Bamako on Friday night with the supplies, including personnel protection equipment kits, gloves, face shields and buckets.

“Speed is of the essence in this Ebola crisis. Agencies such as WFP and WHO are working on every hour to confront together the virus as a matter of priority”, said Denise Brown, WFP’s West Africa Regional Director for the WFP in Dakar. 

  • The supplies came from a 3,000 square metre humanitarian hub in Monrovia dedicated to the Ebola response and established in September by the Logistics Cluster, which groups UN agencies and non-governmental organizations and is managed by WFP.
  • The seats of the plane, which usually transports humanitarian workers between Ebola-affected countries in West Africa, were removed to make space for the medical equipment.
  • WFP has distributed food to 776,000 people since April in Ebola-affected Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea, often on a basis of house-to-house and one family at a time. 
  • WFP provides food assistance to patients in Ebola treatment centres, survivors of Ebola discharged from medical centres and to communities with widespread and intense transmission – including to families of people infected with Ebola in treatment, deceased, or recovering.
  • In support of the media response to stop the spread of Ebola in West Africa, UNHAS has so far transported a total of 1,130 passengers and 12 metric tons of cargo for 40 organizations. 

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. In 2013, WFP assisted more than 80 million people in 75 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
Djaounsede Pardon, WFP/Freetown, Mob. +232 79859690
Alexis Masciarelli, WFP/Dakar, Mob. +221 77 637 5964 
Elisabeth Byrs, WFP/Geneva, Tel. +41 22 917 8564, Mob. +41 79 473 4570
Frances Kennedy, WFP/Rome, Tel. +39 06 6513 3725, Mob. +39 346 760 0806 
Gregory Barrow, WFP/London, Tel.  +44 20 72409001, Mob.  +44 7968 008474

 

MONROVIA – A United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) aircraft has flown one metric ton of critical medical supplies on behalf of the World Health Organization (WHO) to the Malian capital of Bamako after the first case of Ebola was identified in the country.

643722
10/23/2014 - 12:49
Responding to Emergencies

Since September, more than 200,000 refugees from Syria’s Kobane region have crossed the Syrian borders into Turkey and Iraq. Following requests from the Iraqi and Turkish governments, WFP immediately mobilized urgently needed food supplies. But food had to be borrowed from existing rations originally destined to be trucked into Syria this month.

“This influx comes at a critical time as we struggle to meet the urgent food needs of more than six million displaced people inside Syria and in neighbouring countries, let alone new-arrivals,” said Muhannad Hadi, WFP’s Regional Emergency Coordinator for the Syrian crisis. “Stocks being used to meet the recent increasing needs will urgently need to be replenished and we count on the generosity of our donors and especially the Gulf countries so that these people who have just fled horror don’t go hungry,” he added.

In the Turkish border town of Suruc, according to government estimates, over 190,000 refugees are now seeking shelter, the single highest influx recorded since the beginning of the Syria crisis. In coordination with local authorities and the Turkish Red Crescent (TRC), WFP began the distribution of food rations and plans to release an additional 370 metric tonnes of food enough to cover 60,000 people for a period of two weeks.

Over half of the new-arrivals moved to settle in with families already living in local communities, while the remaining families moved into the pre-existing camps in Iraq and newly established transit sites near the Syrian-Turkish border.

In Iraq, some 2,700 newly arrived refugees in Gawilan camp in Dohuk governorate have been assisted with food parcels. WFP is working to reach all other newly arrived refugees. They have settled mostly in the four pre-existing camps in Erbil governorate and in Arbat camp in Suleymaniyah where they will be reached through existing food assistance programmes.  

While WFP works to release more supplies from its remaining stocks, food partners in both Iraq and Turkey are working to fill the gaps. WFP is also coordinating with other humanitarian agencies and is developing contingency plans in case a larger number of people arrive in the coming weeks.

In September, WFP warned that it was running out of funds to provide food for the almost six million Syrians receiving its life-saving assistance. Inside Syria, WFP has been forced to cut back the size of food parcels distributed in October by 40 percent (reducing the calories to 1,140 calories per person) because of the late arrival of financial contributions.

Following generous pledges of funding from major donors, WFP was able to avert cuts in food assistance in October for close to two million Syrian refugees who rely on WFP food vouchers.  The additional funding also allowed WFP to order additional commodities for distribution inside Syria for November. Current funding, however, is not sufficient to avoid food voucher cuts in November and December.

The Syria response is WFP’s largest and most complex emergency worldwide.  WFP needs to raise US$35 million every week to meet the food needs of people affected by the Syrian conflict.

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food in emergencies and working with communities to build resilience. In 2013, WFP assisted more than 80 million people in 75 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media and @wfp_mena

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
Abeer Etefa, WFP/Cairo, Mobile: +2 010 6663 4352
Joelle Eid, WFP/Amman, Mobile: + +962 79727 9403

 

AMMAN – The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) is providing food for tens of thousands of Syrians seeking refuge in Turkey and Iraq amid growing concern that the influx of new arrivals is further straining the agency’s ability to respond to more needs with dwindling stocks and donations running out.

643706
10/21/2014 - 20:00

This follows a memorandum of understanding between the Government of Sierra Leone and the UN Agencies to implement the US$ 28 million World Bank-funded Ebola Response Project, of which US$ 9.5 million was allocated to WFP to deliver food and non-food items. As of 20 October 2014, WFP has already reached more than 300,000 Ebola-affected people in Sierra Leone with 4,000 metric tons of food. These include patients in treatment centres, survivors, quarantined families and communities.

The World Bank partnership between government and the UN Agencies is part of concerted efforts to stop the rapid spread of Ebola Virus Disease in Sierra Leone. It seeks to scale up the country’s logistical and operational capacity and mitigate the economic impact on affected communities.

“We have been hearing alarming stories of Ebola patients going helpless for days in their homes and villages due to logistical constraints. I hope these ambulances will contribute to alleviating the suffering of many families and curbing the spread of the disease” said Gon Myers, WFP Country Director, speaking at a handover ceremony in Freetown today. “At WFP, providing logistical services for government and humanitarian partners is one of our key priorities in response to this unprecedented health crisis.”

Reports from the National Ebola Response Centre (NERC) show that emergency calls to the Ebola response centres have increased from 300 calls per day in early September to more than 1,400 calls per day in October. About 80 percent of these calls require immediate follow up actions to see a sick person or take a suspected Ebola case to the nearest health centre. But it takes several days to get a response due to logistical constraints and shortage of medical personnel.

The World Bank Acting Country Manager, Yusuf Bob Foday said, “The health workers are on the frontline of the battle against this outbreak, fighting a dreaded disease that appears to be taking the upper hand. We cannot allow the morale of these brave doctors, nurses and volunteers to be broken because of lack of logistics. We must therefore provide them with what it takes to carry on with their work, to continue to save lives and to win this battle. So we hope that this delivery will improve mobility, shorten the response time and make the difference between life and death. For the people in quarantine communities, holding and treatment centres, we believe the nutritional assistance will bring relief to their suffering”.

Since the outbreak of the Ebola Virus Disease in Sierra Leone, WFP has been supplying key technical assistance including construction, storage, procurement and transport particularly to medical partners to ensure the best possible humanitarian response to the health emergency. WFP also provides air transport to ensure movement of humanitarian aid workers and equipment within the three Ebola-hit countries.

To ensure continued assistance over the next six months, WFP requires a further US$24 million for its Ebola emergency operation in Sierra Leone.

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. In 2013, WFP assisted more than 80 million people in 75 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media @wfp_WAfrica @WFPlogistics

For more information please contact WFP (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):

Djaounsede Pardon, WFP/Freetown, Mob. +232 79859690

Alexis Masciarelli, WFP/Dakar, Mob. +221 77 637 5964

Elisabeth Byrs, WFP/Geneva, Tel. +41 22 917 8564, Mob. +41 79 473 4570

Emilia Casella, WFP/Rome, Tel. +39 06 6513 3854

Steve Taravella, WFP/Washington DC, Tel. +1 202 653 1149, Mob. +1 202 770 5993

For more information on the World Bank Group support to the Ebola response, please visit our website on www.worldbank.org/health Follow us on twitter: @worldbankhealth

Contacts:

Freetown: Sheriff Mahmud Ismail Email: sismail1@worldbank.org Tel: +23276280641

Washington: Melanie Mayhew Email: mmayhew1@worldbank.org Tel: +1202-458-7891

FREETOWN –With World Bank funding to the Government of Sierra Leone, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) has airlifted 20 ambulances and 10 mortuary pickup trucks to scale up the Government logistical capacity in response to Ebola. This delivery constitutes the first set of 74 vehicles worth US$4 million to be brought in by WFP from its logistical hub in Dubai to Freetown. The remaining 44 vehicles are expected in Freetown by sea in the forthcoming weeks.
643698
10/20/2014 - 14:04

The Spanish donation will go towards the purchase of wheat flour, barley, rice and nutritious food to supplement the basic food basket of the refugee population. In addition, it will cover the transportation costs of an in-kind contribution of 500 metric tons of sugar donated by the Government of Cuba.

"This contribution represents important support to refugees in Tindouf, who depend on foreign aid to survive," said Pedro M. Figueiredo, WFP representative in Algeria. "The commitment of stable donors such as Spain, who, for years have supported this WFP operation, is fundamental to meeting basic needs of food and nutrition of the Sahrawi refugees in Algeria," he added.

Since 2010, the Spanish Agency for International Cooperation for Development (AECID) has contributed US$12.3 million to WFP programmes in the refugee camps of Tindouf.

"Spain maintains access to food security through its support to WFP, support that has been maintained over the years," said Manuel Sánchez-Montero, head of Humanitarian Action of the Spanish Cooperation. "Also, in collaboration with WFP, Spain works to attract the attention of other donors to ensure coverage of the essential needs of the refugee population for almost 40 years in the Algerian Hamada."

WFP has thanked the Government of Spain for supporting its operations to fight hunger around the world and in particular its commitment to the food security of the refugee population of Western Sahara. In the context of the current operation, WFP provides 90,000 general food rations and an additional 35,000 rations to the most vulnerable, with a nutritional value equivalent to 2,166 kilocalories per day.

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food in emergencies and working with communities to build resilience. In 2013, WFP assisted more than 80 million people in 75 countries.

Visite:
www.wfp.org/es
http://www.facebook.com/ProgramaMundialdeAlimentos
http://twitter.com/wfp_es

For more information, please contact (email: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):  
María Gallar, PMA/Algiers, Tel +213 770930339
Lucía Fernánez, PMA/Madrid, +34 672 068 169

 

ALGIERS / MADRID – The UN World Food Programme (WFP) has received a contribution of EUR 1.5 million from the Government of Spain to provide food assistance to the Saharawi refugee camps in Tindouf in western Algeria.

643693
10/20/2014 - 09:38
Responding to Emergencies

This substantial and timely contribution will be divided equally between the three countries, enabling WFP to purchase vital food supplies - mainly rice, lentils or yellow peas, and blended fortified cereals -  for emergency rations for more than  300,000 people for one month, as well as specialised  nutrition products to help prevent malnutrition.

WFP and partners are supplying crucial food and nutrition assistance to the package of care given to people under medical quarantine, as well as to patients receiving treatment and their relatives and affected communities.

“WFP is very grateful for this contribution from the Government of China to help feed the families affected by the Ebola virus,” said Denise Brown, WFP Regional Director for West Africa. “As the number of cases are growing fast, WFP is scaling up its operation and one of the biggest challenges is to ensure that we have sufficient funds to help people.”

“We and the people of West Africa are especially thankful for this contribution from the People’s Republic of China at this very difficult time when we need to reverse Ebola’s advance,” she said.

In recent weeks, the food supply in affected countries has been threatened at many levels. Farmers are abandoning their crops and livestock as they seek areas they perceive as safer away from exposure to the virus. Travel restrictions and displacements have led to increased food prices in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and neighbouring countries.

Since April 2014, 9145 metric tons of WFP food have been provided to nearly 530,000 people directly affected by Ebola

In addition, WFP is assisting the governments of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, and the entire humanitarian community, to ensure that aid workers and critical supplies reach affected areas through the United Nations Humanitarian Air Services, which is managed by WFP.

WFP is also providing crucial logistics and infrastructure support for health partners   In Liberia, at the request of the government and World Health Organization, WFP is doing groundwork for four Ebola Treatment Units in Monrovia with a total of 400 beds.

Since the Ebola outbreak was first identified in West Africa, there has been a surge in the number of cases and areas hit by the disease. According to WHO, 8,914 cases and 4,447, deaths have been reported by the Health Ministries of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

With this contribution from the Government of the People’s Republic of China, WFP has now received one third of the US$179 million it needs for its regional emergency interventions against the unprecedented Ebola outbreak through February.

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food in emergencies and working with communities to build resilience. In 2013, WFP assisted more than 80 million people in 75 countries.

Follow us on Weibo and Wechat:  @联合国世界粮食计划署

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
Yiwen Zhang,  WFP/China, Tel. +86 10 85325228 ext.5309 Mob.+86 13601169994
Alexis Masciarelli, WFP/West Africa, Tel. +221 33 849 65 00, Mob. +221 77 637 59 64

 

BEIJING - The Government of the People’s Republic of China has contributed US$6 million to the United Nations World Food Programme’s (WFP) emergency operation to assist 1 .3 million people impacted by the Ebola virus outbreak in the three most-affected countries – Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

643690
10/17/2014 - 14:55
Responding to Emergencies

The distribution in the suburb of Waterloo will be the biggest one-off food distribution in the country since the start of the Ebola outbreak.

WFP mobilized 700 aid workers to distribute in just one day over 800 metric tons of food– rice, pulses, vegetable oil and salt ** – meeting families’ food needs for 30 days. The distribution is in partnership with Caritas, Community Integrated Development Organization, civil society organizations and young volunteers.

“Providing food to such a large number of people in one day is a challenge. We have to deploy many staff and speed up the distribution process to reduce risks both for the people receiving food and for staff, as Waterloo has seen some of the highest cases of Ebola infections in recent days,” said Gon Myers, WFP Country Director in Sierra Leone.

“We are working closely with the Sierra Leone Government, NGOs and UN agencies to ensure timely delivery of food assistance to all Ebola-affected people – be it in treatment centres or in quarantined households - to prevent this health crisis from becoming a food and nutrition crisis.”

The aim of the distribution is to stabilize quarantined families by giving them enough to eat so that they do not leave their homes to look for food.

Before today’s distribution in Waterloo, WFP and its partners had provided food assistance to more than 300,000 Ebola-affected people across Sierra Leone. Given the increasing rate of infections, WFP is scaling up to reach 600,000 people affected by the crisis.

Beyond the food response, WFP is supplying vital technical assistance, particularly to medical partners, in this unprecedented health emergency. This includes construction, logistics, storage, procurement and transport.

WFP is supporting the Sierra Leone Government by procuring 74 World Bank-funded vehicles including ambulances, mortuary vehicles and pickup trucks.  The first batch of 30 vehicles is expected to arrive by air in the country on 18 October.

As WFP ramps up to help fight the most severe acute public health emergency in modern times, it requires US$179.6 million to distribute food and provide common humanitarian services in the Ebola-affected countries of Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea until February 2015. Less than a third has been received.  

To ensure continued assistance over the next six months, WFP requires US$24 million for its Ebola emergency operation in Sierra Leone.

**Note to readers: The actual ration distributed on the day consisted of rice and Super Cereal.

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food in emergencies and working with communities to build resilience. In 2013, WFP assisted more than 80 million people in 75 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media  @wfp_WAfrica  @WFPlogistics

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
Djaounsede Pardon, WFP/Freetown, Mob. +232 79859690
Alexis Masciarelli, WFP/Dakar, Mob. +221 77 637 5964
Elisabeth Byrs, WFP/Geneva, Tel. +41 22 917 8564, Mob. +41 79 473 4570
Frances Kennedy, WFP/Rome, Tel. +39 06 6513 3725, Mob. +39 346 760 0806
Gregory Barrow, WFP/London, Tel.  +44 20 72409001, Mob.  +44 7968 008474
Bettina Luescher, WFP/New York, Tel. +1 646 556 6909, Mob. +1 646 824 1112

 

 

FREETOWN – Amid concerns over the increasing rate of Ebola infection in Sierra Leone, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and partners today began distributing food for 265,000 people on the outskirts of the capital.

643687
10/17/2014 - 11:01
Responding to Emergencies

“We have not heard from our colleague for almost 24 hours, and we are extremely concerned about his well-being. WFP demands that his captors release our staff member unharmed,” said Eddie Rowe, WFP’s Acting Country Director in South Sudan.

WFP is working urgently to secure the safe release of its staff member, and urges South Sudan’s government and security forces to do everything within their power to see that the captured aid worker is freed quickly and uninjured.

WFP calls on all parties to recognize and respect the impartiality, neutrality and independence of humanitarian workers who are delivering lifesaving assistance to millions of people in need in South Sudan.

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food in emergencies and working with communities to build resilience. In 2013, WFP assisted more than 80 million people.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
George Fominyen, WFP/Juba, Mob. +211 922 465 247
Challiss McDonough, WFP/Nairobi, Tel. +254 20 762 2179, Mob. +254 707 722 104

 

JUBA – The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) is deeply concerned about the safety of one its staff members who was taken at gunpoint from the Malakal airport Thursday by eight armed men wearing plain clothes.

643682
10/17/2014 - 09:49

World Food Day is celebrated every year on 16 October by the United Nations Rome-based Food and Agriculture Organization and World Food Programme as well as by governments around the world. The theme of this year’s World Food Day is ‘Family farming: feeding the world, caring for the earth’.  Africa Day for Food and Nutrition Security is celebrated on 30 October and this year has the theme of ‘Accelerated Action for a Hunger Free Africa’.  This year marks the fifth commemoration of the Africa Day for Food and Nutrition Security and coincides with the 10th anniversary of Declaration of CAADP.   In Malawi, the two days are being honoured together to galvanize support in meeting the UN Secretary-General’s Zero Hunger Challenge and AU Heads of State and Government declaration,  ‘Hunger Free Africa by 2015’.

Family farmers are responsible for at least 56 percent of agricultural production globally. They form the backbone of food production, while preserving traditional food products, contributing to balanced diets, protecting the earth’s agro-biodiversity and pioneering sustainable use of natural resources.

Despite their great importance, however, family farmers – especially female farmers – are among the world’s most vulnerable people. Increasingly, their livelihoods are threatened by climate change-related extreme events. This calls for accelerated action to overcome these obstacles and committing more resources to deliver services to them.

Government, UN and partner-led programmes aimed at achieving food and nutrition security and enhancing resilience offer solutions to these challenges and can bring prosperity to family farmers and smallholders.

“Clearly, family farmers need to produce enough food not just for themselves, but also for people in rural areas not involved in farming or city dwellers,” says UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) Director General, José Graziano da Silva. “They also need to generate income – money to buy inputs such as seeds and fertilizers, but also to guarantee decent livelihoods including paying for their children’s education and other needs. When family farmers are stronger, it’s a win-win situation: more food available locally translates into more food security and into the possibility of producing and buying food for and in local markets.”

The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2014 report confirms Malawi has reached Millennium Development Goal hunger-reduction target before 2015, proof of the progress possible when government and partners work together for lasting change.

“Despite challenges, we are making real progress in the fight to end hunger and chronic malnutrition,” says UN World Food Programme (WFP) Executive Director Ertharin Cousin. “Thanks to the work we do with our partners on emergency preparedness, support to family farmers, nutritional assistance – particularly in a child’s first 1,000 days – and building the resilience of communities to withstand shocks, millions of people are now better able to focus on building a future free of hunger for themselves and the next generation.”

The goal of a Hunger Free Africa is set to motivate firm action toward improving food security and nutrition indicators and targets. For this to happen, partners at all levels must concert efforts to develop and implement comprehensive plans of action for improving food availability, access, quality and sustainability. Hunger Free Africa by 2025 can be achieved through “sustainable, resilient and diversified livelihoods and diverse diets that meet their nutritional needs”. This requires implementing a comprehensive programme supported by sound national policies, which are designed through inclusive processes and information systems. Such programmes must target the poor, hungry and malnourished people, typically: children, women, female-headed households, youth, smallholders, pastoralists and peri-urban people.

In Malawi, women make up to 70 percent of the agricultural workforce and contribute to 80 percent of food for family consumption. In recognition of this valuable contribution, UN Women is this year joining the celebration to promote the role of the rural woman and her contribution to family food security. A communiqué developed by women farmers in honour of International Day of Rural Women (celebrated on 15 October) will feed into October’s food and nutrition security celebrations.

“‘We must enforce and protect the rights of rural women,” says UN Women Executive Director Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka. “When women have access to land, there are improvements in household welfare, agricultural productivity and gender equality. And greater progress is made against poverty, gender-based violence and HIV/ AIDS. It makes everybody better off."

The Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Water Development will this year commemorate World Food Day and African Day for Food and Nutrition Security with FAO, WFP, UN Women and partners on Friday 31 October 2014 at Mchuchu Primary School, T. A. Kalumbu in Lilongwe District.
The general public is invited to take part in the commemoration event.

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For more information please contact:

Mrs M.A Mgomezulu, Tel +265995556444/0888556444
Sarah Rawson, WFP/Malawi, Tel. +265 01774666. Ext 2402, sarah.rawson@wfp.org  
Mike Chipalasa, FAO/Malawi, Tel. +265 0888 715 385, Mike.Chipalasa@fao.org
Susan Huggins, UN Women/Malawi, Tel. +265 0997957674, susan.huggins@unwomen.org

 

LILONGWE – The Government of Malawi, the United Nations and partners are marking World Food Day and African Day for Food and Nutrition Security by celebrating the importance of family farming in reducing poverty and improving food security through small-scale, sustainable agricultural production.

643681
10/17/2014 - 08:40

“Every year, we witness hunger’s devastating effect on families, communities and whole economies,” said WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin. “But despite horrific crises engulfing entire regions, we are making real progress in the fight to sustainably and durably end hunger and chronic malnutrition. Thanks to the work we do with our partners on emergency preparedness, support to family farmers, nutritional assistance – particularly in a child’s first 1,000 days – and building the resilience of communities to withstand shocks, millions of people are now better able to focus on building a future free of hunger for themselves and the next generation.”

According to The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2014 report, the total number of hungry people in the world is down by 37 million, to 805 million, and 63 countries have reached international hunger-reduction targets before 2015, proof of the progress possible when governments, humanitarian organizations and the private sector come together to make lasting change.

Recent studies have outlined the devastating effect that hunger and under-nutrition can have on the lives of individuals, communities and national economies. Data from a series of studies called the Cost of Hunger in Africa has shown that hunger is capable of reducing a nation’s workforce by 9.4% and national GDPs by up to 16.5%, severely limiting a developing country’s ability to make much needed investments and grow.

This shows why the international community must continue to strive towards a world with zero hunger, a world in which children and families can build their futures and farmers can better provide for themselves and help their communities become self-sufficient, Cousin said. 

Every year, WFP marks World Food Day alongside the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) in Rome and offices around the world.

The theme for this year’s World Food Day is “family farming,” one of the many ways WFP is supporting local economies to build self-sufficiency and people to achieve zero hunger in their communities. Here are just a few of the ways WFP is helping an average of 90 million people a year focus on their futures:

  • Providing emergency food assistance to people affected by natural and manmade disasters, such as the outbreak of Ebola in West Africa and the civil conflicts in Syria, Iraq, Central African Republic and South Sudan
  • Running or supporting school meals programmes in remote places, giving roughly 20 million of the poorest children a chance at a brighter future
  • Prioritizing the purchase of food in developing countries and from family and small-scale farmers to support local economies
  • Partnering with companies and organizations around the world to improve WFP operations, create innovative solutions and raise funds and awareness

In the Philippines, WFP supports the Government in helping displaced Filipinos affected by conflict in Mindanao, addressing their food security needs through projects in school feeding, nutrition support, and livelihood assistance. WFP also works alongside national and local government in their efforts to effectively and efficiently prepare for and respond to natural disasters – as well as the impacts of climate change – by implementing projects in selected highly disaster-prone provinces.

“The Philippines, having been ravaged by a series of typhoons annually and lately by Typhoon Haiyan, it is important that we work with small-scale farmers through family farms to help address their food insecurity,” said WFP Philippines Representative and Country Director Praveen Agrawal.

More information about what zero hunger can do for people is available at www.wfp.org/WorldFoodDay.

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food in emergencies and working with communities to build resilience. In 2013, WFP assisted more than 80 million people in 75 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_philippines and Facebook WFP.Philippines

For more information please contact (email: FaizzaFarinna.Tanggol@wfp.org):

Faizza Tanggol, WFP/Manila, Tel. +63 2 750-2561 local 2420, Mob. +63 917-880-9368

MANILA/ROME – Amid several hunger emergencies – both natural and man-made – the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) is marking World Food Day, 16 October, by highlighting both the challenges around the world and the real progress being made towards “zero hunger”.

643665
10/16/2014 - 08:59
RBA

“Every year, we witness hunger’s devastating effect on families, communities and whole economies,” said WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin. “But despite horrific crises engulfing entire regions, we are making real progress in the fight to sustainably and durably end hunger and chronic malnutrition. Thanks to the work we do with our partners on emergency preparedness, support to family farmers, nutritional assistance – particularly in a child’s first 1,000 days – and building the resilience of communities to withstand shocks, millions of people are now better able to focus on building a future free of hunger for themselves and the next generation.”

According to The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2014 report, the total number of hungry people in the world is down by 37 million, to 805 million, and 63 countries have reached international hunger-reduction targets before 2015, proof of the progress possible when governments, humanitarian organizations and the private sector come together to make lasting change.

Recent studies have outlined the devastating effect that hunger and under-nutrition can have on the lives of individuals, communities and national economies. Data from a series of studies called the Cost of Hunger in Africa has shown that hunger is capable of reducing a nation’s workforce by 9.4% and national GDPs by up to 16.5%, severely limiting a developing country’s ability to make much needed investments and grow.

This shows why the international community must continue to strive towards a world with zero hunger, a world in which children and families can build their futures and farmers can better provide for themselves and help their communities become self-sufficient, Cousin said.  

Every year, WFP marks World Food Day alongside the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) in Rome and offices around the world.

The theme for this year’s World Food Day is “family farming,” one of the many ways WFP is supporting local economies to build self-sufficiency and people to achieve zero hunger in their communities. Here are just a few of the ways WFP is helping an average of 90 million people a year focus on their futures:

•    Providing emergency food assistance to people affected by natural and manmade disasters, such as the outbreak of Ebola in West Africa and the civil conflicts in Syria, Iraq, Central African Republic and South Sudan
•    Running or supporting school meals programmes in remote places, giving roughly 20 million of the poorest children a chance at a brighter future
•    Prioritizing the purchase of food in developing countries and from family and small-scale farmers to support local economies
•    Partnering with companies and organizations around the world to improve WFP operations, create innovative solutions and raise funds and awareness

More information about what zero hunger can do for people is available at www.wfp.org/WorldFoodDay.
 
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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food in emergencies and working with communities to build resilience. In 2013, WFP assisted more than 80 million people around the world. Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media and @wfp

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):

Tyler Guthrie, WFP/Rome, Tel, +39 6513 3873, Mob. +39 348 024 4246
Emilia Casella, WFP/Rome, Tel. +39 06 6513 3854, Mob. +39 347 9450634
Gregory Barrow, WFP/London, Tel.  +44 20 72409001, Mob.  +44 7968 008474
Elisabeth Byrs, WFP/Geneva, Tel. +41 22 917 8564, Mob. +41 79 473 4570
Bettina Luescher, WFP/New York, Tel. +1-646-5566909, Mob.  +1-646-8241112

 

ROME – Amid several hunger emergencies – both natural and man-made – the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) is marking World Food Day, 16 October, by highlighting both the challenges around the world and the real progress being made toward “zero hunger.”