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Official statements announcing key developments in WFP operations and activities.
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646513
05/27/2015 - 14:25
Responding to Emergencies

The latest Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) analysis, released today, confirmed fears that unrelenting conflict and the onset of the lean season are intensifying alarming levels of hunger – both in conflict-affected areas and in other parts of the country.

“Millions of people in South Sudan are trapped by a terrible mix of brutal conflict, rising hunger and a deepening economic crisis,” said Joyce Luma, WFP’s Representative and Country Director in South Sudan. “A staggering number of people are going hungry. This analysis is a chilling reminder to the world that South Sudan cannot be forgotten.”

According to the IPC results, about 4.6 million people, or 40 percent of South Sudan’s estimated population, face acute hunger in the next three months and will require urgent lifesaving food or livelihoods assistance.

WFP is concerned that deteriorating economic conditions could quickly make things even worse. WFP also fears that that a lack of funding and shrinking humanitarian access are compromising relief agencies’ ability to meet South Sudan’s escalating needs.

The direst conditions are in the three conflict-affected states of Jonglei, Upper Nile and Unity, where fighting continues to displace large numbers of people in very remote areas. Conflict prevents people from growing food and disrupts markets. Along with harassment by parties to the conflict, it also limits humanitarian agencies’ ability to reach those in need.

Food insecurity is also deepening in states that were not directly affected by conflict, such as Warrap and Northern Bahr el Ghazal, where high food prices, rising inflation, depreciation of the local currency and diminishing purchasing power are pushing many families closer to the brink.

“The needs are overwhelming at a time when resources are short. We need significantly more funding, not only to continue our existing assistance but also to scale up to support more people as the situation worsens,” said Luma. “We are now having to prioritize our assistance to focus on the most critical needs, and without additional resources those decisions will only get more difficult, and more people may have to go without help.”  

WFP currently has a funding shortfall of US$230 million for its food and nutrition assistance and is revising its requirements to help the growing number of people affected by conflict.

WFP is using all means at its disposal – including airdrops, river boats, and distributions of food, cash or vouchers – to reach hungry people in conflict zones with life-saving emergency food and nutrition. WFP is supporting vulnerable families in other parts of South Sudan with programmes to improve food security, including school meals and asset-creation initiatives.

The IPC analysis was conducted by food security and humanitarian assessment specialists from a number of aid and development agencies, along with technical experts from the South Sudanese government. According to the analysis, famine is not predicted anywhere in South Sudan in the next three months, but it will become a serious risk in some areas later in the year unless adequate humanitarian assistance can be delivered.

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 75 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media and @wfp_africa

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
George Fominyen, WFP/Juba, Mob. +211 922 465 247
Challiss McDonough, WFP/Nairobi, Tel.  +254 20 762 2179, Mob. +254 707 722 104
Jane Howard, WFP/Rome, Tel. +39 06 6513 3854, Mob. +39 347 9450634
Elisabeth Byrs, WFP/Geneva, Tel. +41 22 917 8564, Mob. +41 79 473 4570

 

JUBA – The UN World Food Programme (WFP) has warned that South Sudan is facing the worst levels of food insecurity in the young country’s history because of a combination of conflict, high food prices and a worsening economic crisis.

646501
05/27/2015 - 10:43

ROME - The number of hungry people in the world has dropped to 795 million -- 216 million fewer than in 1990-92 -- or around one person out of every nine, according to the latest edition of the annual UN hunger report (The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2015 – SOFI).

In the developing regions, the prevalence of undernourishment – which measures the proportion of people who are unable to consume enough food for an active and healthy life -- has declined to 12.9 percent of the population, down from 23.3 percent a quarter of a century ago reports SOFI 2015, published today by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and the World Food Programme (WFP).

A majority - 72 out of 129 – of the countries monitored by FAO have achieved the Millennium Development Goal target of halving the prevalence of undernourishment by 2015, with developing regions as a whole missing the target by a small margin. In addition, 29 countries have met the more ambitious goal laid out at the World Food Summit in 1996, when governments committed to halving the absolute number of undernourished people by 2015.

“The near-achievement of the MDG hunger targets shows us that we can indeed eliminate the scourge of hunger in our lifetime. We must be the Zero Hunger generation. That goal should be mainstreamed into all policy interventions and at the heart of the new sustainable development agenda to be established this year," said FAO Director General José Graziano da Silva.

"If we truly wish to create a world free from poverty and hunger, then we must make it a priority to invest in the rural areas of developing countries where most of the world's poorest and hungriest people live," said IFAD President Kanayo F. Nwanze. "We must work to create a transformation in our rural communities so they provide decent jobs, decent conditions and decent opportunities. We must invest in rural areas so that our nations can have balanced growth and so that the three billion people who live in rural areas can fulfil their potential

“Men, women and children need nutritious food every day to have any chance of a free and prosperous future. Healthy bodies and minds are fundamental to both individual and economic growth, and that growth must be inclusive for us to make hunger history,” said WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin.

Striking advances, given challenging environment

Progress towards fully achieving the 2015 food security targets was hampered in recent years by challenging global economic conditions.
Extreme weather events, natural disasters, political instability and civil strife have all impeded progress -- 24 African countries currently face food crises, twice as many as in 1990; around one of every five of the world’s undernourished lives in crisis environments characterized by weak governance and acute vulnerability to death and disease.

SOFI 2015 notes that over the past 30 years crises have evolved from catastrophic, short-term, acute and highly visible events to protracted situations, due to a combination of factors, especially natural disasters and conflicts, with climate change, financial and price crises frequently among the exacerbating factors.

Hunger rates in countries enduring protracted crises are more than three times higher than elsewhere. In 2012 some 366 million people were living in this kind situation -- of whom 129 million were undernourished - 19 percent of all food-insecure people on the planet.

Yet, alongside these challenges, the world population has grown by 1.9 billion since 1990, making reductions of the number of hungry people all the more striking, the report says.

Bright lights and darker shadows on the hunger map

Large reductions in hunger were achieved in East Asia and very fast progress was posted in Latin America and the Caribbean, southeast and central Asia, as well as some parts of Africa, showing that inclusive economic growth, agricultural investments and social protection, along with political stability makes the elimination of hunger possible.  Above all, the political will to make hunger eradication a paramount development objective has fostered progress.

Sub-Saharan Africa is the region with the highest prevalence of undernourishment in the world -- at 23.2 percent, or almost one in every four people. However, African nations that invested more in improving agricultural productivity and basic infrastructure also achieved their MDG hunger target, notably in West Africa.

The proportion of hungry people in Latin America and the Caribbean has dropped from 14.7 percent to 5.5 percent since 1990, while the share of underweight children (below 5 years of age) also declined sharply. A strong commitment to hunger reduction was translated into substantial social protection programmes which, coupled with strong economic growth, drove continent-wide progress.

Diverse trends were observed in different parts of Asia. Countries in Eastern and Southeast Asia have achieved steady and rapid reduction in both malnourishment indicators, buoyed by investment in water and sanitation infrastructure as well as favourable economic prospects.

In southern Asia, the prevalence of undernourishment has declined modestly, to 15.7 percent from 23.9 percent, but much greater progress was made in reducing underweight among young children.

Severe food insecurity is close to being eradicated in North Africa, with the prevalence of undernourishment below 5 percent, while dietary quality is of growing concern in the region, where there is a rising prevalence of overweight and obesity.

In West Asia, where hygiene conditions are generally advanced and child underweight rates low, the incidence of hunger has risen due to war, civil strife and consequent large migrant and refugee populations in some countries.

Lessons from the MDGs experience

While there is no one-size-fits-all solution for how to improve food security, the SOFI report outlines several factors that played a critical role in achieving the hunger target.
First, improved agricultural productivity, especially by small and family farmers, leads to important gains in hunger and poverty reduction. High performers on that front in Africa met the MDG hunger target while those that made slower progress did not.

Second, while economic growth is always beneficial, not least because it expands the fiscal revenue base necessary to fund social transfers and other assistance programmes, it needs to be inclusive to help reduce hunger. Inclusive growth provides a proven avenue for those with fewer assets and skills in boosting their incomes, and providing them the resilience they need to weather natural and man-made shocks.  Raising the productivity of family farmers is an effective way out of poverty and hunger.

Third, the expansion of social protection – often cash transfers to vulnerable households, but also food vouchers, health insurance or school meal programs, perhaps linked to guaranteed procurement contracts with local farmers - correlated strongly with progress in hunger reduction and in assuring that all members of society have the healthy nutrition to pursue productive lives.

Some 150 million people worldwide are prevented from falling into extreme poverty thanks to social protection, according to SOFI -- but more than two-thirds of the world’s poor still do not have access to regular and predictable forms of social support. Transfers help households manage risk and mitigate shocks that would otherwise leave them trapped in poverty and hunger.

The full State of Food and Agriculture in the World 2015 report is available online, here

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For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):

Frances Kennedy, WFP/Rome, Mob.  +39 346 7600806
Elisabeth Byrs, WFP/Geneva, Tel. +41 22 917 8564, Mob. +41 79 473 4570
Gregory Barrow, WFP/London, Tel.  +44 20 72409001, Mob.  +44 7968 008474
Bettina Luescher, WFP/New York, Tel. +1 646 5566909, Mob. +1 646 8241112
Steve Taravella, WFP/Washington DC, Tel. +1 202 653 1149, Mob. +1 202 770 5993

 

 

72 countries have achieved the Millennium Development target of halving proportion of the chronically undernourished.

646499
05/27/2015 - 09:39
For Companies, School Meals

The Vodafone Egypt Foundation contribution (approximately 9 million Egyptian Pounds) will benefit 67,000 people in the poorest and most remote areas of Assiut, Fayoum and Beni Suef governorates. WFP will use the funds to provide nutritious daily snacks and monthly food rations to school children and their families as well as nutrition awareness training for 300 teachers.

This agreement builds on the existing partnership WFP and Vodafone Egypt Foundation have established since 2011.

“Sharing a common belief on the importance of education to every child, WFP and Vodafone Egypt Foundation are partnering on this one-year project targeting Upper Egypt,” said WFP Egypt Representative and Country Director Lubna Alaman. “Vodafone Egypt Foundation is once again extending its support to our school feeding programmes in Egypt. Through in-school snacks and monthly take-home rations, WFP encourages parents to enrol and maintain their children in schools,” she added.

WFP’s school feeding programmes provide direct food assistance in the form of a daily snack of date bars enriched with minerals and vitamins. This nutritious mid-day snack helps reduce short-term hunger and improves children learning capacities.

The project benefits children, especially girls, enrolled in government led pre-schools and non-formal primary schools, located in the most disadvantaged areas in Egypt. Families whose children maintain an attendance rate above 80 percent receive a monthly food ration that compensates for the wage a child would earn if sent to work instead of school. The take-home rations constitute about 20 percent of the family’s monthly expenditure on food thus making it a major incentive for families to send their children to school rather than work.

In 2014, more than half a million school children and their family members benefitted from WFP’s school feeding in the poorest governorates of Egypt.

“WFP’s school feeding programme is one of the most successful projects Vodafone Egypt Foundation supports; it helps underprivileged communities get out of the vicious circle of illiteracy and poverty through promoting education and providing food assistance to families who spend most of their income on food,” said Chairman of Vodafone Egypt Foundation Mohamed Henna. “We aim to contribute towards the sustainable development of Egypt’s less fortunate communites through enhancing education and health.”

Henna affirmed that this successful partnership with WFP reflects the commitment of Vodafone Egypt Foundation in providing education opportunities for children particularly in Upper Egypt, knowing how education is the “essence of economic development”.
 
Since 2007, WFP has built up partnerships with private sector corporates and businesses which have funded several activities of the WFP Country Programme in Egypt. These partnerships have grown, and currently these contributions have reached a total of about US$ 7 million, which are mostly directed towards WFP’s safety nets programmes such as school feeding activities.
 
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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 75 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media  @wfp_mena

For more information please contact:
Amina Alkorey, WFP/Cairo, Tel. +202 2581730, Mob. +2 01028531535 email: amina.alkorey@wfp.org

 

CAIRO – The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) welcomed today a US$1.2 million contribution from Vodafone Egypt Foundation that will benefit thousands of children, their families and teachers through WFP’s school feeding programme in Upper Egypt.

646498
05/27/2015 - 09:33

Today the U.S. vessel Liberty Grace docked in Port Sudan carrying 47,500 metric tons of sorghum, a household food staple in Sudan.

The shipment is part of a US$135 million contribution committed by USAID to WFP Sudan for 2015 and will help WFP to provide much-needed food assistance to conflict-affected communities and other food insecure and vulnerable groups across the country.

This contribution comes during the lean season - when vulnerable households have exhausted their stocks of food and need assistance. The lean season in Sudan usually stretches from May to October.

“The American people, on this occasion working through WFP remain committed to helping vulnerable people in Sudan.  We hope that fighting ceases imminently so that there will no longer be need for food assistance in Sudan,” said US Charge d’Affaires, Ambassador Jerry Lanier.

The United States has been a long-standing partner, supporting WFP activities in Sudan from the early 1960s.  Since 2011, when Sudan split into two countries, the U.S.A. has been the single largest donor to WFP Sudan, contributing a total of some US$626 million to WFP Sudan’s emergency operations and a further US$19.8 million to UN Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS). This contribution of US$135 million represents 74 percent of WFP’s  food requirements in Sudan this year.

“We are grateful for the exceptional support of the Government and the people of the United States for their continued support which enables us to meet the needs of vulnerable and conflicted affected populations. The vessel which sailed from the U.S.A. has finally arrived in Port Sudan with the food that will be delivered to the remotest and most hard to reach areas of Sudan,” said WFP Sudan Deputy Country Director for Operations Margot Vandervelden.

The U.S. contribution will help WFP support food-insecure people in the country, including 1.8 million internally displaced in Darfur, as well as supporting more than half a million school children in Darfur and around 262,000 in central and eastern Sudan through WFP’s school feeding programme for a six-month period.

In 2015, WFP plans to assist 3.7 million people across Sudan through direct food assistance, cash vouchers and nutrition programmes, as well as recovery and resilience-building activities that help communities to become self-reliant. This includes 2.8 million people in the conflict-affected region of Darfur and close to one million vulnerable people in the Central, Eastern and Three Areas, including South Kordofan and Blue Nile states.

#                              #                                 #

WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 75 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media  @wfp_mena

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
Amor Almagro, WFP/Khartoum, Tel. +249 183248001 (ext. 2114), Mob. +249 912174853
Abdulaziz Abdulmomin, WFP/Khartoum, Tel. +249 183248001 (ext. 2123), Mob. +249 912167055

 

 

PORT SUDAN – The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) today welcomed a new food contribution from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) that is enough to feed 1.8 people for three months.

646497
05/27/2015 - 09:24

Around 31,000 people have been forced to flee over the past two weeks, mostly from the Timbuktu region, following an escalation of attacks by armed groups. More than 500 people have crossed the border into neighbouring Niger, Mauritania and Burkina Faso over the past few days.

The newly displaced in the Timbuktu region are finding refuge in the towns of Tonka, Goundam and Gourma Rharous in the north of Mali, staying in temporary shelters, camping, or with host families. They are in urgent need of water, food, other relief items and shelter.

“The fighting in the north of Mali is greatly reducing an already limited humanitarian space and hampers vital humanitarian assistance to people who are very vulnerable. Both river and road transport are being severely affected by fighting, disrupting deliveries of food assistance by WFP and our partners,” said Sally Haydock, WFP Mali Country Director.

“The current state of affairs is only adding to an already difficult situation as over 3 million people struggle to have enough food to eat, and host communities brace themselves to face a harsh lean season,” she added.

A national food security and nutrition survey earlier this year found that 410,000 people were in need of immediate food assistance. The number is likely to get higher as food stocks decrease during the lean season before the new harvest comes in. WFP plans to assist at least 350,000 people from June through September.

“If the situation continues to deteriorate, we expect more people to be in need of life-saving food assistance,” said Haydock. “To date, less than half of WFP’s funding needs are met.  WFP urgently requires an additional US$64 million to continue meeting growing needs.”

In 2015, WFP overall aims to support 1.2 million people in Mali—providing emergency relief and additional support for communities emerging from crisis.

In Niger, Burkina Faso and Mauritania, WFP also plans to provide food assistance to the newly arriving Malian refugees.

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 75 countries.

Follow us on Twitter: @WFP_WAfrica; @wfp_media  

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
Maude Berset, WFP/Mali, Mob. +223 76 71 26 29
Adel Sarkozi, WFP West Africa/Dakar: +221 776375964
Elisabeth Byrs, WFP/Geneva: +41 79 473 4570
Frances Kennedy, WFP/Rome: +39 0665133725
Bettina Luescher, WFP/New York, Tel. +1-646-5566909, Mob.  +1-646-8241112
Gregory Barrow, WFP/London, Tel.  +44 20 72409001, Mob.  +44 7968 008474

 

BAMAKO – The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) has begun distributing food assistance to some 29,000 people displaced by recent violence in northern Mali. WFP provided 13 metric tons of high energy cereal bars on Saturday and has now begun distributing a one-month food ration.

646492
05/26/2015 - 10:08
Responding to Emergencies

“With indications that the 2015 harvest in Syria may exceed the last two years’ harvests at a time of massive food insecurity and internal displacement, it is paramount that crops are not lost and that food stays within the country,” said WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin.
 
“We must support unhindered and unrestricted food transport across frontlines; this will ensure food now available in one part of the country reaches Syrians wherever they are in the country,” she added. “Farmers need peace to harvest and to move their produce to markets. I am urging all sides to allow this to happen.”
 
“Without a humanitarian pause by all sides, providing unhindered access to Syrian food and opening up corridors for transport, people will still go hungry despite a good harvest, and prices for food will remain high,” Cousin said.
 
Staffan de Mistura, the UN Special Envoy for Syria who addressed a WFP Executive Board meeting in Rome on Monday, applauded the call.
 
“I strongly welcome and support the appeal by WFP. The Syrian people have shown incredible resilience and determination in going through this terrible conflict; they should be given a chance to make sure their own crops can reach their own people safely during this critical period,” said de Mistura.  
 
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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 75 countries.
 
Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media & @wfp_mena
 
For more information please contact
(email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
Abeer Etefa, WFP/Cairo, Mob. +2 01066634352
Peter Smerdon, WFP/Rome, Mob. + 39 342 878 4107
Elisabeth Byrs, WFP/Geneva, Tel. +41 22 917 8564, Mob. +41 79 473 4570  
Gregory Barrow, WFP/London, Tel.  +44 20 72409001, Mob.  +44 7968 008474
Bettina Luescher, WFP/New York, Tel. +1-646-5566909, Mob.  +1-646-8241112

 

 

 

ROME – The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) has called for humanitarian pauses in the fighting in Syria so farmers can safely harvest and transport crops within the country to reach all Syrians in need.

 

646489
05/26/2015 - 09:02

The research was supported and guided by the Government of Bangladesh, and funded by Switzerland, Germany, the United Nations Development Programme, UK’s Department for International Development through its Transform Nutrition research programme, and the United States of America.

The two-year study sought to determine the benefits of five different combinations of transfers provided to ultra-poor women with small children: 1) cash only, 2) food only, 3) cash and food combined, 4) cash and nutrition behaviour change communication training* , and 5) food and nutrition behaviour change communication training.

Using a rigorous state-of-the-art impact evaluation, researchers found that these interventions caused significant improvements on income, food expenditure, calorie consumption, food poverty, diet quality and chronic undernutrition (also known as stunting).

The greatest impact came from cash transfers when they were combined with nutrition education. In the northwest of Bangladesh, over the two years of the project this formula caused significant improvement in children’s nutrition, with a 7.3 percentage point decrease in the proportion of children suffering stunting.

“These intriguing outcomes confirm that if we provide regular cash transfers to ultra-poor women with small children, and combine this with good nutrition training, we can achieve a significant reduction in child stunting within a short period of time,” said WFP Representative Christa Räder.

Undernutrition remains a major challenge in Bangladesh, with serious consequences for the economy and health systems, costing more than USD 1 billion in lost productivity every year.
 
 “Given that 36 percent of all children under five in Bangladesh are stunted, it is essential to design safety nets wisely,” said Dr. Akhter Ahmed, lead researcher of the IFPRI team and Chief of Party of the IFPRI Policy Research and Strategy Support Program in Bangladesh. “Households who participated in nutrition education sessions in our research project consumed more diverse foods and took better care of their children than those who received only food, cash or both.”

* In Bangladesh, USD 3.9 billion, or about 12 percent of the government budget, is allocated to social safety net programmes for the fiscal year 2015.

Note to editors:

Under the research initiative, 4,000 ultra-poor women and their 21,600 family members in the north-western and southern regions of Bangladesh received a monthly transfer for 24 months from May 2012 to April 2014. Each of the five research arms consisted of 800 people: 400 in the intervention group and 400 in the control group. The transfers were each worth 1,500 Taka per month.

Women received their cash transfers through mobile phone transfers. For this purpose they were given a mobile handset, a SIM card, and a mobile bank account.

The nutrition education involved one-on-one counselling by trained community nutrition volunteers as well as weekly group sessions which included other family members and influential community members. Using a range of tools and techniques including real-life examples, role plays and cooking demonstrations, they aimed to improve knowledge, skills and behaviours in the areas of health, hygiene, sanitation and nutrition.

Behaviour change communication (BCC) are communication or education activities that help foster a change in behaviour in individuals, families or communities, for example by encouraging dietary diversity or best practices in breast-feeding.

For more information please contact:
Christa Räder, Representative, WFP/Bangladesh, Tel. +880-2-9183022-33
Akhter Ahmed, Chief of Party, IFPRI/Bangladesh, Tel. +880-2-989-8686
Leonora Beck, Communications Officer, WFP/Bangladesh, Tel. +8801755642173, leonora.beck@wfp.org

 

DHAKA – Which combination of cash, food and nutrition education in social safety nets brings the greatest benefits for ultra-poor rural families? The findings of a joint research initiative seeking an answer to this question were presented today by the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

646480
05/25/2015 - 09:49

The funds will help WFP prevent hunger and treat malnutrition among the most vulnerable people in Sudan. WFP will use the contribution to provide life-saving food assistance to more than 152,000 displaced people in West and South Darfur for two months, as well as to more than 193,000 newly displaced people across Darfur for four months.  This includes people who were displaced in 2014 and have not been able to return home, in addition to those who have been displaced since January this year.  

The contribution will also be used to buy Super Cereal Plus (a nutritious porridge) for the treatment of malnutrition in about 58,000 children aged under five, pregnant women and nursing mothers in the Darfur region and in the states of Kassala, Red Sea.

"The humanitarian situation in Sudan remains critical following years of conflict, natural disasters and underdevelopment. The response to acute malnutrition is one of the main strategic pillars of intervention of the European Commission in the country, with the purpose of saving the lives of children under the age of five,” said ECHO Head of Office in Khartoum Jeroen Uytterschaut. “The European Commission and the EU as a whole is among the main donors for humanitarian assistance in Sudan and thanks to our partnership with the World Food Programme, hundreds of thousands of Sudanese will continue receiving life-saving food aid.”

The EU is a major donor to WFP Sudan, providing €22.9 million in support of emergency operations from 2014 to 2015.  Since 2012, ECHO has contributed more than €67 million towards WFP’s emergency operations and a further €9.8 million towards the United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS), managed by WFP, which provides safe and reliable passenger and light cargo services to the entire humanitarian community in Sudan.  

“We are very grateful to ECHO for their continous support to WFP’s operations in Sudan.  This latest contribution will help us reach vulnerable groups in the country through both life-saving and nutritional asistance, especially during the lean season when food stocks are depleted and children and mothers in need could easily slide into malnutrition,” said WFP Sudan Country Director Adnan Khan.  

In 2014, ECHO’s contribution enabled WFP to assist some 80,800 children, pregnant women and nursing mothers mostly in Kassala and Red Sea states. It also supported some 38,350 refugees in Kassala state, 149,500 vulnerable people in South Kordofan and another 35,000 internally displaced people in North Kordofan through food voucher programmes.  

In 2015, WFP plans to assist 3.7 million people across Sudan, of whom 2.7 million live in the conflict-affected region of Darfur, internally displaced people in Blue Nile and South Kordofan, refugees in Kassala state and other food insecure vulnerable groups elswhere in the country.

#                              #                                 #

WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 75 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media and @wfp_africa

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
Amor Almagro, WFP/Khartoum, Tel. +249 183248001 (ext. 2114), Mob. +249 912174853
Abdulaziz Abdulmomin, WFP/Khartoum, Tel. +249 183248001 (ext. 2123), Mob. +249 912167055

 

KHARTOUM - The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) today welcomed a contribution of €9 million (US$9.7 million) from the European Commission’s Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection Department (ECHO) to its emergency operations in Sudan.

646477
05/25/2015 - 09:10
Responding to Emergencies

•    Since the 25 April quake, WFP has provided food to more than 1.7 million people in the worst-affected areas. The number is on track to increase to 1.9 million in the coming days. Mountainous terrain and landslides made this a very complex operation and WFP is using trucks, tractors and helicopters to deliver to reach people in need.

•    The second phase, known as Operation Mountain Express, is starting to reach people in high-altitude, remote areas. Teams of mountaineers are reaching villages and assessing needs on behalf of WFP and the wider humanitarian response. Up to 20,000 local porters will soon begin bringing aid to these communities. This also gives employment to porters who were out of work because of the drop in tourism.

•    The coming monsoon season in Nepal is adding further urgency to relief operations because heavy rains expected from June will curtail access to remote rural areas.

•    WFP’s logistics support for the entire humanitarian response includes a network of logistics hubs, a land supply route from India, a fleet of trucks, and helicopters to reach areas inaccessible by road. WFP also provides emergency telecommunications services for aid organizations.

•    One of the key reasons why WFP was able to reach nearly 2 million people in the first month after the disaster is a relief dispatch hub at Kathmandu’s airport known as the Humanitarian Staging Area. Run by WFP and funded by the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development, it opened four weeks before the earthquake as part of a larger joint programme of disaster preparedness. This advance planning enabled WFP to be operating immediately after the earthquake.

•    WFP urgently needs funding to sustain this vital and versatile emergency response for survivors of the quake. You can help by making a donation at www.wfp.org/Nepal

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 75 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media  and @wfp_asia

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
Zoie Jones, WFP/Kathmandu, Mob. +977 9802 039 678 
Silke Buhr, WFP/ Bangkok, Tel. + 66 2 6598616 ext, 2160 Mob. +66 81 701 9208
Jane Howard, WFP/Rome, Tel. +39 06 65132321, Mob. +39 346 7600521
Elisabeth Byrs, WFP/Geneva, Tel. +41 22 917 8564, Mob. +41 79 473 4570  
Gregory Barrow, WFP/London, Tel.  +44 20 72409001, Mob.  +44 7968 008474
Bettina Luescher, WFP/New York, Tel. +1 646 5566909, Mob. +1 646 8241112
Steve Taravella, WFP/Washington DC, Tel. +1 202 653 1149, Mob. +1 202 770 5993

 

KATHMANDU – In the month since a devastating earthquake hit Nepal, nearly 2 million people have received food assistance from the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and a new phase of the response is underway to reach people in high-altitude villages.

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05/22/2015 - 14:01
Responding to Emergencies

Some 25,000 people received emergency food assistance yesterday (May 21) in Habbaniya, west of Baghdad, and supplies for 15,000 additional displaced people were en route for Amiriyat Al Fallujah. In the past week, WFP and its partners have provided emergency supplies to more than 45,000 people in locations across the affected area.

“Most families escaping the violence in Ramadi are without food, water and shelter and have nowhere to go,” said WFP Representative and Iraq Country Director Jane Pearce. “We are providing them with emergency food but more is needed as they depend almost entirely on humanitarian assistance. We call on the international community to respond quickly to their plight."

•    Since the Ramadi crisis started on 10 April, WFP and its partners have now assisted more than 208,000 people with three-day emergency food packages.

•    The three-day ready-to-eat rations are designed to meet the dietary needs of people on the move. Each ration includes canned meat, tahini, canned beans and fish, dates and bread.

•    WFP is pre-positioning emergency food supplies with partners for distribution in order to assure a continuous rapid response if needs should increase in the coming days.

•    On 21 May, WFP completed distributions of monthly food rations to 28,500 people who have cooking facilities in Amiriyat Al Fallujah. These family food parcels include wheat flour, sugar, cooking oil and rice.   

•    WFP has carried out distributions to people fleeing the Ramadi conflict in Baghdad, Babil, Kerbala, Diyala, Wassit, Erbil and Sulaymaniyah, as well as to the newly displaced in eastern Anbar governorate.

•    Last year, WFP reached 1.8 million displaced and conflict-affected people across Iraq’s 18 governorates and aims to provide monthly assistance to about the same number this year.

•    WFP urgently needs US$108 million to continue its operation in Iraq until October this year. WFP will start running out of food and money for its voucher programme in areas with functioning markets in the coming months if no new contributions are received.

•    Due to significant funding shortfalls, WFP since April has reduced the size of monthly family food rations it provides to displaced families outside camps. Families who depend almost entirely on assistance because they live in camps will still receive full rations.

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 75 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_mena

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
Marwa Awad, WFP/Erbil, Mobile +964 780 915 0764
Abeer Etefa, WFP/Cairo, Mobile: +2 010 6663 4352
Jane Howard, WFP/Rome, Mobile: +393467600521
Bettina Luescher, WFP/New York, Tel. +1 646 5566909, Mob. +1 646 8241112
Elisabeth Byrs, WFP/Geneva, Tel. +41 22 917 8564, Mob. +41 79 473 4570

 

BAGHDAD – The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) is rushing food assistance into Iraq’s Anbar governorate as tens of thousands continue to flee fierce fighting in the Ramadi district.