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News Releases

Official statements announcing key developments in WFP operations and activities.
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651381
08/23/2017 - 15:10

“Food Security and Emigration: Why people flee and the impact on family members left behind in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras” shows the need to invest in long-term programmes to discourage people in the Dry Corridor from emigrating, and to reduce the risks for emigrants and the impact on the families left behind.

The study shows a trend of younger and more vulnerable people leaving food-insecure areas, especially in the Dry Corridor, a drought-prone area that crosses these countries.

“The study provides an important insight into why people flee and the impact on the family members staying behind,” said WFP Regional Director for Latin America and the Caribbean, Miguel Barreto. “It is perhaps this second aspect which makes this study stand out from much of the analysis conducted on migration from El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras to date.”

“Human rights are the cornerstone for social inclusion, democracy, and peace. However, when millions of our fellow citizens of the Americas still suffer from hunger, it is an indication that much remains to be done. We welcome this study, that can help us to find solutions for those who are forced by hunger to leave their homes”, said OAS Assistant Secretary General Nestor Mendez.

Family members left behind face the burden of paying the debts of those who have migrated. If the emigration is unsuccessful, the family faces the problem of growing debt and of how to meet their food needs, the report said.

The document also pointed out that 47 percent of the families interviewed were food- insecure; such levels of food insecurity have not been previously recorded in the region even in the assessments carried out in the past three years in the Dry Corridor.

Some 72 percent of the families interviewed said they were applying “emergency” coping strategies such as selling their land, farm animals and tools to buy food.

Meanwhile 78 percent of the family members left behind are receiving a monthly remittance and indeed 42 percent of the surveyed families reported that remittances were their only source of income, according to the study. More than half of the money received from emigrants is used by family members to buy food, followed by agricultural investments – like buying land and animals -- and investing in small businesses.

This study was funded and jointly produced by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and the World Food Programme (WFP), with the collaboration of the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the Organization of American States (OAS).

The research is a follow-up to the results and recommendations of the exploratory study on the links between migration, violence and food security, “Hunger without Borders”, released in 2015.

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 80 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media  & wfp_es

To download the report click here  

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
Alejandro Chicheri, WFP/Latin America, Tel. +507 317 3936, Mob.  +507 6671 5355
Challiss McDonough, WFP/Washington Tel. +1-202-653-1149   Mob. +1-202-774-4026
Frances Kennedy, WFP/Rome. Mob: +39 346 7600806

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. – A new inter-agency study released today found a correlation between the prolonged droughts in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras – exacerbated by El Niño phenomenon from 2014 to 2016 — and the increase in irregular migration from these countries to the United States of America.

651378
08/22/2017 - 15:36

WFP, in partnership with local NGOs, is giving micro-nutrient fortified biscuits to people living in four of the worst-affected areas of Dinajpur, Gaibandha, Kurigram and Lalmonirhat.

“Many flood survivors have lost everything: their homes, their possessions, their crops. People need food right now, and the full impact on longer-term food security threatens to be devastating,” said WFP Representative Christa Räder.

Families staying in temporary shelters will receive 3.75 kg of biscuits to help them through the coming days. Many cannot return to their homes and lack access to cooking facilities. Many have lost their homes, businesses, crops and livelihoods, and are now vulnerable to deteriorating food insecurity, lack of income and poverty.

More than 6.9 million people have been affected by the floods, and more than 580,000 hectares of crop land have been destroyed.

In addition to providing immediate food assistance, WFP plans to support 100,000 of the poorest and most vulnerable, i.e. households of women without an adult male, disabled persons and the elderly, with three rounds of cash assistance over the course of three months to buy food and other immediate necessities. Each family will receive BDT 4,000 per month (totalling USD 150), starting from September.

WFP’s response is part of a joint United Nations emergency response coordinated with the Government of Bangladesh, international and national NGOs and donors, working to address immediate needs and help flood victims to get back on their feet.

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About WFP
WFP is the world's leading humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 80 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media and @wfp_asia

For more information, please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
Christa Räder, Representative, WFP Bangladesh, Tel. +880-171-159-6032
Line Sofie Adser, Communications Officer, WFP Bangladesh, Tel. +880-2-918-3022 ext. 2164

 

DHAKA – The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) is distributing emergency food supplies to more than 200,000 people in northwest Bangladesh, about a week after massive floods inundated more than half the country.

651377
08/22/2017 - 14:10

The European Commission Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations department (ECHO) contribution will help provide Sahrawi refugees with diversified monthly food rations that include cereals (rice, barley and wheat flour), pulses, vegetable oil, sugar and fortified blended foods.

For more than 40 years, the Sahrawi refugees have been living under extremely harsh conditions in the Sahara Desert in southwestern Algeria. Hosted in five refugee camps near Tindouf, refugee families rely primarily on WFP assistance to secure their food needs as
employment opportunities are limited.

“This timely contribution, which we are very grateful for, enables WFP to continue to support Sahrawi refugees who have been living in extreme conditions for years and remain highly dependent on humanitarian assistance,” said Romain Sirois, WFP Representative in Algeria. “The European Commission and ECHO have shown continued generosity over the years in support of Sahrawi refugees.”
 
The European Commission is one of the largest donors for WFP’s work in support of Sahrawi refugees in Algeria. This year, European Commission contributions have covered  almost one-third of WFP funding requirements for this operation.

WFP has been supporting refugees from Western Sahara in Algeria since 1986. All WFP assistance in Algeria is carried out and monitored in collaboration with national and international organizations to ensure the assistance reaches the people for whom it is intended.

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 80 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media and @wfp_mena

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
Katharina Meyer-Seipp, WFP/Algiers, Tel. +213 21 60 80 66, Mob. +213 660811416
Abeer Etefa, WFP/Cairo, Tel. +2010 66634352
Reem Nada, WFP/Cairo, Tel. +201066634522

 

ALGIERS – The European Union has contributed €4.9 million (US$5.5 million) to the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) to continue to cover the basic food needs of Sahrawi refugees residing in camps in Algeria.

651373
08/21/2017 - 09:06

The Department for International Development (DFID) contribution will allow WFP to support IDPs through cash-based transfers, which will provide people with vouchers and e-cards so they can buy food and essential supplies of their choice at contracted local traders.   

“The UK Government is committed to working with WFP to meet the humanitarian needs of displaced people within Sudan,” said Acting Head of DFID Sudan Kate Orrick. “We have provided a total of £53.5 million to WFP since 2013, providing vital assistance to hundreds of thousands of people in Sudan and enabling them to start rebuilding their lives.”

“The use of cash and vouchers enables greater choice and dignity for vulnerable Sudanese, stimulates the local economy, and has the greatest positive impact on those receiving our support,” Orrick added.

WFP will use the contribution to support 288,000 IDPs in North and West Darfur states and nearly 81,000 IDPs in Otash camp, located in South Darfur state.

“We are grateful to the people and Government of the UK for this contribution towards our cash programmes, which is a more efficient form of assistance and allows for greater autonomy and dignity while providing a lifeline to those most in need,” said WFP Sudan Representative and Country Director Matthew Hollingworth.  

With UK support, WFP successfully launched the first cash programme in Sudan last year in Otash camp in South Darfur. During the pilot phase of the cash transfer programme (October 2016 to March 2017), nearly 75,000 IDPs in Otash camp received approximately US$37.50 per person for five months. The assistance was provided through a prepaid card swiped against a Point of Service (POS) device at pre-selected shops.

In Sudan, the introduction of vouchers in 2009 and cash assistance in 2016 continues to transform the relationship between vulnerable displaced people and their food needs. Cash-based assistance provides people with greater choice of food items and access to locally-preferred ingredients, while stimulating the local economy and supporting WFP’s needs-based approach in a protracted crisis. Over the past six years, WFP in Sudan has expanded the use of cash over regular food distributions. Evidence gathered through ongoing monitoring and feedback from people receiving WFP support shows that cash-based transfers are generally the preferred form of assistance.

Throughout 2017, WFP plans to support more than four million vulnerable people in Sudan, including IDPs, refugees, people affected by climate change and host communities. WFP provides such support through a range of activities, including emergency food assistance, cash-based transfers (or vouchers), nutritional support, and resilience-building activities to help communities become increasingly independent.

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 80 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media @wfp_mena

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
Bianka Zyra, WFP/Khartoum, Tel. +249 183248001 (ext. 2107), Mobile: +249 912505210
Abdulaziz Abdulmomin, WFP/Khartoum, Tel. +249 183248001 (ext. 2123), Mob. +249 912167055

 

KHARTOUM – The United Kingdom has contributed £4.5 million (US$5.8 million) to the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) to provide essential food assistance to nearly 370,000 internally displaced people (IDPs) in Darfur for two months.

651368
08/18/2017 - 11:06

The initiative is supported by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) - Pakistan and will focus on preventing stunting during the “1,000-day window of opportunity,” the period between a woman’s pregnancy and her child’s second birthday. Inadequate nutrition during this time can irreversibly affect a child’s cognitive and physical development. WFP will work with the Office of Research Innovation and Commercialization (ORIC) in Kurram to deliver locally produced specialized nutritious food for children aged 6-24 months, along with pregnant women and nursing mothers, through an extensive network of community-based female health workers and health facilities. In addition, children aged 24-59 months will receive micronutrient supplements. More than 75,000 children and women will benefit from the programme, and government staff will be trained to support and implement the programme to ensure its sustainability.

Senior officials from the FATA Secretariat, Directorate of Health, Khyber Medical University (KMU) and WFP participated in the launch event on 18 August. The chief guest of the event, Mr. Muhammad Fida Wazir, Additional Chief Secretary FATA stated that, subject to the availability of resources, the initiative will be gradually extended to other agencies of FATA.

The Vice Chancellor of KMU noted that this effort will strengthen the evidence base for providing specialized food for children and mothers to prevent stunting. Together with WFP programmes to support livelihoods and school feeding, he expressed hope that this programme will help reverse the trends of stunting in FATA.  

“Stunting can rob children of the opportunity to reach their full potential in life,” said WFP Pakistan Acting Country Director Stephen Gluning. “In order to break the inter-generational cycle of undernutrition, we need to focus on mothers and very young children. We’ve already seen this approach show very promising results in Sindh, and we are hoping to see similar improvements in FATA.”

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with the communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists 80 million people in 80 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media; @Pakistan; Facebook: WFP Pakistan

For more information, please contact (email address:
Mahira Afzal, WFP Islamabad, Mobile: +92 345 8559333, mahira.afzal@wfp.org

 

 

PESHAWAR – The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), in partnership with the Directorate of Health Services in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) of Pakistan, has formally launched a programme to prevent stunting in the Kurram Agency of FATA. Stunting occurs when a child’s growth and development is impaired from poor nutrition. The effort aims to prevent chronic malnutrition in children under five years of age as well as in pregnant women and nursing mothers. In the Kurram Agency, stunting rates stand at 57.6 percent, which is alarmingly high and well above the global average.

651364
08/18/2017 - 09:06

Around the globe, we come together on Saturday, 19 August for World Humanitarian Day to support the millions of people across the globe trapped in conflicts and to pay tribute to the aid workers who care for them.

In all corners of the world, World Food Programme colleagues are working tirelessly to make sure that children and their families, suffering and broken apart by violence and fighting, have enough to eat. Today we remember their determination and dedication to alleviate suffering and meet the needs of the most vulnerable. We celebrate their courage and commitment to work on the frontlines of hunger, often at great risk to their own personal safety. Some have lost their lives while trying to save others.

This year, we especially mourn the tragic loss of three men working under contract for WFP -- Daniel James, Ecsa Tearp and Ali Elario, who were shot dead in April while reporting for duty in Wau, South Sudan. Our thoughts and prayers are with their families.

Humanitarian workers go where the need is, and far too often that is where conflict is as well. Fighting and violence drive 80 percent of all humanitarian needs, and 10 of WFP’s 13 largest food assistance operations are driven primarily by conflict. In Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan and Yemen, more than 20 million people, including 1.4 million children, are on the brink of famine. Increasingly, those involved in the conflicts in these areas are targeting aid workers.
 
On World Humanitarian Day, we come together to reaffirm that civilians caught in conflict and those who care for them are #NotATarget.  We appeal to world leaders to take action to protect them and to deliver on the promise of our mutual, shared humanity.

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 80 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media  

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
Jane Howard, WFP/Rome, Tel. +39 06 65132321, Mob. +39 346 7600521
Gregory Barrow, WFP/London, Tel.  +44 20 72409001, Mob.  +44 7968 008474
Bettina Luescher, WFP/Geneva, Tel. +41 22 917 8564, Mob. + 41-79-842-8057
Gerald Bourke, WFP/New York, Tel. +1 646 5566909, Mob. +1 646 525 9982

 

Statement by WFP Executive Director David Beasley

651361
08/17/2017 - 12:57

The study determined that the prevalence of anaemia dropped by 4.8 percent and zinc deficiency reduced by 6 percent among women consuming fortified rice. The research compared VGD women who received 30kg of fortified rice and an investment grant of BDT 15,000 (US$185), with those who received 30kg of normal (non-fortified) rice per month.

This is the first time that the use of fortified rice in a government safety net programme has been tested in Bangladesh. The VGD programme reaches more than one million ultra-poor women and their families, totalling about five million people, giving it enormous potential reach.

“The findings are very promising,” said Christa Räder, WFP Representative in Bangladesh. “Now we have a much better understanding of how integrating fortified rice into government safety net programmes can help improve women’s micronutrient status.”
                                                                                                                 
The Ministry of Women and Children Affairs has allocated more than US$1 million to distribute fortified rice in 35 upazilas (regions) covered by the VGD programme in the fiscal year 2017-2018. The Scaling-up Rice Fortification Initiative is supported by the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Bangladesh and implemented by various government agencies in collaboration with WFP.

 

QUICK FACTS: Findings of the study

  • Consumption of fortified rice reduces the prevalence of anaemia and zinc deficiency;
  • Consumption of fortified rice contributed to reduced morbidity among VGD women; and
  • VGD women provided with fortified rice and a cash grant were more empowered to make financial decisions at home.

 

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About Fortified Rice
Rice fortification provides an immediate, ready-to-use product that helps to address micronutrient deficiencies at a large scale. Fortified rice kernels look, taste and cook like ordinary rice but are enhanced with six essential vitamins and minerals: Vitamin A, Vitamin B1, Vitamin B12, Folic Acid, Iron and Zinc. They are mixed with ordinary rice at a ratio of 1:100.

About WFP
WFP is the world's leading humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 80 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media and @wfp_asia

For more information, please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
Christa Räder, Representative, WFP Bangladesh, Tel. +880-171-159-6032
Line Sofie Adser, Communications Officer, WFP Bangladesh, Tel. +880-2-9183022 ext. 2164

 

 

DHAKA – A new study has shown that consuming fortified rice can significantly reduce anaemia and zinc deficiencies among the poorest women in Bangladesh. Conducted by the research centre icddr,b and on behalf of the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), the study measured the impact of providing rice enriched with micronutrients to women participating in the Government’s Vulnerable Group Development (VGD) programme. The study also found that fortified rice, when combined with training and cash grants for investment, can also contribute to women’s empowerment.

651370
08/17/2017 - 12:15

The funding will contribute to providing WFP rations of cereals, pulses, oil and salt to some 62,500 Chadian households in the Sahel, along with half-rations to 114,500 Su-danese refugees who have been living in camps in the East for more than a decade.

"This important contribution from Japan comes at a time when food insecurity affects more than 30-40 percent of the people in several Sahelian regions,” said WFP Coun-try Director in Chad, Mary-Ellen McGroarty. “It allows WFP to fulfill its mission: to provide life-saving assistance to the most vulnerable people and prevent a deteriora-tion of their situation during the difficult period of the lean season.”

The announcement coincides with the lean season in Chad, when food stocks are low before the next harvest and market prices soar, deepening hunger among many peo-ple who are already living on the edge.

“Through this new contribution to WFP, the Government of Japan supports Chad’s efforts to attain food security for all, which contributes to the development of human capital in this country,” said Japan’s Ambassador to Chad, Kunio Okamura.

WFP supports almost half-a-million people in Chad through food distributions and cash-transfers, including to refugees, returnees and internally displaced persons who are affected by instability in neighbouring countries. WFP also assists another 490,000 Chadians living in vulnerable communities of the Sahel.

#                              #                                 #

WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 80 countries.

The Government of Japan has been a steadfast supporter of people in Chad through economic cooperation and generous donations to WFP and other humanitarian organ-izations. At the global level, Japan consistently ranks among WFP’s top 10 donors.

Follow us on Twitter: @WFP_WAfrica, @wfp_media

For more information please contact:                          
Charlène Cabot, WFP/Chad : +235 66 99 34 20
Takuya Nakagome, Embassy of Japan: +237 222 20 62 02

 

N’DJAMENA ── The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) welcomes Ja-pan’s contribution of US$2.75 million (Yen 300 million) to provide food assistance to 177,000 vulnerable people in Chad’s Sahel region, many of whom are uncertain where their next meal will come from.

651365
08/17/2017 - 09:15

The purpose of this commitment is to start a dialogue with the Government of the Republic and approve by the end of 2017 a long-term political agreement to reduce current chronic undernutrition rates at least by half by 2030. This political agreement will ensure budget support, clear objectives and goals, and activities that will provide stability and sustainability to the efforts implemented by the State.

The WFP Executive Director saw for himself the situation on the ground as part of a three-day visit to Guatemala. Beasley met indigenous women and small children who received special nutritious food after a medical check-up to help eradicate chronic undernutrition. He saw a group of mothers trained on health and nutrition practices teaching other mothers how to prepare nutritious food to their children in their Kakchiquel language. “We were in the community of Xeabaj in Santa Apolonia, where we saw activities to promote better infant and young child nutrition, but these efforts must be intensified,” said Beasley.

The Strategic Review of Food and Nutrition Security Situation in Guatemala, prepared by the Research and Social Studies Association (a local think tank) with the support of WFP, highlighted the importance of addressing chronic malnutrition and its root causes if Guatemala is to reach the Sustainable Development Goal 2 - Zero Hunger. The report revealed that the people most vulnerable to food insecurity live in the regions of the North, Southwest and Northwest. These areas are rural and are mainly home to indigenous groups.

Party leaders and the chairpersons of the committees of food security, agriculture, finance, transparency and health also signed the agreement, which prioritizes the strengthening of existing actions, and promotes the involvement of key actors in the fight against hunger.

Guatemala has the highest stunting rate in Latin America and the Caribbean, with a prevalence of 46.5 percent among children under five. The fight against chronic malnutrition is a priority for the government. Adequate nutrition for the mother during pregnancy and for her child during the first two years of life is essential for the youngster’s body and brain to develop fully.

WFP, working closely with the Government of Guatemala, works to ensusre good nutrition for children during the first 1,000 days so they can realize their full potential.

Another key factor affecting food and nutritional security in Guatemalans is the impact of climate change, specifically in the Dry Corridor. The three years of drought has forced many communities deep into hunger, especially those in remote areas

“It is urgent to establish specific and sustainable actions that will continue over time irrespective of changes of power at local or national level. For this, there must be active involvement of government institutions, civil society and the private sector,” said WFP Representative in Guatemala, Mario Touchette.

The Commitment against Chronic Malnutrition in Guatemala aims to bring together the efforts of the government, the civil society and the private sector to support those affected by food insecurity and to achieve the 17 Sustainable Development Goals by 2030.

#                              #                                 #

WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 80 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
Alejandro López-Chicheri, WFP/Latin America and the Caribbean, Mob. +507 6671 5355
Jane Howard, WFP/Rome, Tel. +39 06 65132321, Mob. +39 346 7600521
Gregory Barrow, WFP/London, Tel.  +44 20 72409001, Mob.  +44 7968 008474
Gerald Bourke, WFP/New York, Tel. +1-646-5566909, Mob.  +1-646 525 9982

 

GUATEMALA CITY – The President of the National Congress, Oscar Stuardo Chinchilla, members of Congress, and the Executive Director of the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley, today signed a commitment to end the scourge of chronic malnutrition or stunting, which currently affects almost half of Guatemalan children and deprives the country of important human capital.

651360
08/16/2017 - 16:15

Hours after Monday’s mudslides around Freetown, WFP began distributing initial two-week rations of rice, pulses, vegetable oil and salt to the hardest-hit communities of Regent, Sugar Loaf and Mortomeh around the capital.  The assistance will be provided to both survivors of the mudslides and households hosting them, as well as rescue workers and mortuary attendants.

The UN has tasked WFP to support and coordinate a joint and effective humanitarian response to ensure food, shelter and other essential assistance is delivered to those who need it as speedily as possible.

“The mudslides have left a path of death and devastation,” said WFP Representative and Country Director Housainou Taal. “Our thoughts and prayers go to the victims and their families. At the same time, we are now focusing on the survivors, so they can recover and move ahead.”

The experience of Sierra Leone’s Ebola outbreak has prepared the humanitarian community to offer a swift, joint response to this current emergency.  Beyond delivering food assistance, WFP is working closely with the government and other partners in search and rescue efforts, notably by providing logistics, geo-spatial mapping of disaster areas and other support.  

“We can only hope the rains and flash floods will subside, so the current emergency does not turn into a larger catastrophe,” Taal said.

WFP has been working in Sierra Leone since 1968. Our food and nutritional assistance helps more than 800,000 people to build resilience and supports some of the country’s most vulnerable residents, including Ebola orphans and survivors, people living with HIV and tuberculosis, and smallholder farmers.  

Hi-res photos available here: https://spaces.hightail.com/receive/AuqVrXo5B6

#                              #                                 #

WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 80 countries.
    
Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media,  @wfp_WAfrica  

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
Francis Boima, WFP/Freetown, Tel. +232 76750787
Elizabeth Bryant, WFP/Dakar, Tel. +221 338496500/ext. 2103, Mob. +221 639 4271
Jane Howard, WFP/Rome, Tel. +39 06 65132321, Mob. +39 346 7600521
Gregory Barrow, WFP/London, Tel.  +44 20 72409001, Mob.  +44 7968 008474
Gerald Bourke, WFP/New York, Tel. +1-646-5566909, Mob.  +1-646 525 9982

 

FREETOWN – The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) is distributing food assistance to 7,500 people affected by the massive mudslides and flooding in Sierra Leone that have killed scores of people and left many more homeless and in desperate need of assistance.