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Official statements announcing key developments in WFP operations and activities.
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646111
04/24/2015 - 21:03

“Without reliable access to food, this region and its children are in danger,” she said, saying that people in need of food became easy targets for traffickers and for extremists.

"Until we deliver the political solutions that create peace, we must implement the humanitarian solutions that create hope and stability across the region."

She concluded: “We must maintain essential lifesaving food access and nutrition programmes including the necessary funding.”

Cousin appealed to the Security Council and member nations for more money for WFP programmes. Funding shortfalls meant that WFP had been forced to cut the amount of food provided to Syrian families by 30 percent. And assistance for almost a quarter of a million refugees living in absolute poverty in neighbouring countries had been halved.

“When we announced the reductions in Jordan our hotlines were overwhelmed. Thousands of appeal calls come in each day. Calls from families that have exhausted their resources and feel abandoned… by us all. One woman told us, 'I cannot stay… if I cannot feed my children.'"

WFP is funded entirely by voluntary contributions from governments, companies and private individuals.

In 2015, the agency planned to reach 4 million people a month inside Syria and 2.1 million in neighbouring countries, but, said Cousin, funding shortfalls were putting this already limited assistance in jeopardy. “The longer the crisis continues, its victims become ever more vulnerable,” she said. Families were making impossible decisions to find and access food, such as marrying off young daughters, or letting children fight in armed groups.

Cousin said the decline in food security and the destruction and weakening of water and health services had created a serious nutritional crisis.

She noted that Security Council Resolution 2165, passed last year, calling for border crossings to be opened, had enabled WFP to reach an additional 528,000 people in need of food.

Cousin spoke at a Security Council briefing also addressed by the Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator Valerie Amos, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees António Guterres, and UNHCR’s Special Envoy for Refugees Angelina Jolie.

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 75 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media and @WFP_mena

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):

Abeer Etefa, WFP/Cairo, Tel. +202 2528 1730 ext. 2600, Mob. +201066634352
Bettina Luescher, WFP/New York, Tel. +1 646 5566909, Mob. +1 646 8241112
Jane Howard, WFP/Rome, Tel. +39 06 65132321, Mob. +39 346 7600521
Elisabeth Byrs, WFP/Geneva, Tel. +41 22 917 8564, Mob. +41 79 473 4570
Gregory Barrow, WFP/London, Tel. +44 20 72409001, Mob. +44 7968 008474
Steve Taravella, WFP/Washington DC, Tel. +1 202 653 1149, Mob. +1 202 770 5993
NEW YORK – The Executive Director of the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) Ertharin Cousin today highlighted in front of the UN Security Council the vital role of food in bringing peace and stability to Syria.
646090
04/24/2015 - 14:21

Despite the efforts of the authorities and WFP, more than 1.8 million people – mostly smallholder and subsistence farmers and day labourers – remain affected by the impact of both the drought in 2014 and the Coffee Rust in Guatemala and Honduras.  Their situation is not expected to improve until late 2015, according to assessments carried out by the two governments, WFP and partners in both countries.

“We are very grateful to ECHO for this timely contribution which comes at the peak of the lean season and with a poor harvest forecast as families are still struggling to recover from last year’s drought and the impact of the Coffee Rust,” said WFP Regional Director for Latin America and the Caribbean, Miguel Barreto. “The severity and duration of the drought left its mark on families with fragile livelihoods who have limited access to land, basic health services and education.”

Through ECHO funding and in coordination with the governments, WFP will assist some 52,500 people in Guatemala and 20,500 people in Honduras to meet their immediate food and urgent needs through cash and voucher transfers for a period of 90 days.

Cash and vouchers will be distributed among people who participate in asset creation activities to help them rebuild their livelihoods.  These activities include soil and water conservation, agriculture best practices and training to cope with natural events, as well as strengthening surveillance systems for food and nutrition.
Special groups – comprising elderly or disabled people, families with acutely malnourished children, households headed by women, as well as those with no access to land—will also receive cash and vouchers.

WFP and the governments of Guatemala and Honduras are implementing all of the asset creation activities in coordination and with the technical support of other partners on the ground.

Cash and vouchers are especially useful when food is available in the markets, but people lack the resources to buy it. Most of the beneficiaries who will receive cash and vouchers live in Western Guatemala, South-Western Honduras and the Dry Corridor –a drought-prone area also shared with El Salvador and Nicaragua.  

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 75 countries.

 

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
Alejandro Chicheri, WFP/Latin America and the Caribbean, Tel. 507 317 3900, Mov. 507 6671 5355
Elio Rujano, WFP/Latin America and the Caribbean, Tel. 507 317 3900, Mob. 507 6677 0608 Francisco Fión, WFP/Guatemala, Tel +502 2300 6000, Mov. +502 5994 9404
Hetze Tosta, WFP/Honduras, Tel. +504 3190-5773

 

PANAMA CITY – The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) has welcomed a contribution of €3 million (US$3.1 million) from the European Commission’s Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection Department (ECHO) to provide food assistance to approximately 73,000 people affected by the drought in Guatemala and Honduras.

646053
04/22/2015 - 10:23
Responding to Emergencies

“We are extremely worried about the fate of our missing colleagues and are working hard for their safe return,” said WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin. “Our staff take enormous risks every day to bring vital aid to people in critical need.”

The three WFP staff members disappeared on April 1 en route to a food distribution.  They were traveling in a convoy from Malakal to Melut, carrying food intended for thousands of conflict-affected people, when witnesses say intercommunal fighting erupted along the road on which they were traveling.  WFP lost contact with the three men and has not heard from them since, despite intense efforts to reach them. 

The disappearance comes amid generally deteriorating security and increasing harassment of humanitarian workers throughout the country.  WFP fears that worsening insecurity in some parts of South Sudan will make it harder for humanitarian agencies to reach conflict-affected communities with badly needed assistance, just as the lean season is set to begin.

“We are equally concerned about the welfare of innocent people, particularly women and children, who are suffering the consequences of this conflict,” Cousin added. “We are committed to assisting the South Sudanese people the best we can, but we cannot do our lifesaving work unless national and local authorities are willing and able to safeguard humanitarian staff.”

Because of increasing concerns about staff safety, WFP is re-assessing its ability to work in some parts of Upper Nile State.  The agency plans to temporarily reduce its operations in those areas where it no longer believes it’s safe to work. 

“We regret that we must temporarily suspend food assistance in Akoka and Fashoda counties,” said WFP Deputy Country Director Eddie Rowe, in Juba. “We hope to resume as soon as we have the necessary assurances that our staff and partners can work safely."

The agency has been working with authorities in Juba, Malakal and Akoka to seek information about the whereabouts of the three missing staff members, to no avail.

The United Nations says 10 humanitarian workers have been killed in Upper Nile State since the start of South Sudan’s conflict more than 16 months ago. 

Another WFP colleague, Mark Diang, was abducted at gunpoint in October 2014 from the airport in Malakal, capital of Upper Nile State and hasn’t been heard from since.  WFP holds grave concerns for his safety and continues to follow up with the government regarding his status.

In South Sudan, 2.5 million people started this year unsure of where their next meal is coming from. Food security analysts believe this number will increase with the start of the lean season in May.  WFP aims to assist roughly 3 million people throughout the country in 2015.

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 75 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media  @wfp_africa

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
George Fominyen, WFP/Juba, Mob. +211 922 465 247
Challiss McDonough, WFP/Nairobi, Tel.  +254 20 762 2179, Mob.  +254 707 722 104
Jane Howard, WFP/Rome, Tel. +39 06 65132321, Mob. +39 346 7600521
Elisabeth Byrs, WFP/Geneva, Tel. +41 22 917 8564, Mob. +41 79 473 4570
Gregory Barrow, WFP/London, Tel.  +44 20 72409001, Mob.  +44 7968 008474
Bettina Luescher, WFP/New York, Tel. +1-646-5566909, Mob.  +1-646-8241112
Steve Taravella, WFP/Washington DC, Tel. +1 202 653 1149, Mob. +1 202 770 5993

 

JUBA/ROME – The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) says it is deeply concerned about the fate of three staff members who disappeared in South Sudan’s Upper Nile State earlier this month.

646043
04/21/2015 - 10:34

The USAID food consists of lentils, oil and sorghum – a household staple in Sudan. The contribution is especially timely, coming ahead of the lean season, which starts in May, when food needs among the most vulnerable are typically at their highest.

“We are very grateful for the continued and unparalleled support of the people and Government of the United States, which enables us to meet the food needs of vulnerable and conflict-affected groups across Sudan,” said WFP Sudan Country Director Adnan Khan. “Amid continuing humanitarian needs in some regions, it is critical that the international community reinforces its commitments to the needy in Sudan.

The U.S. contribution will help WFP support food-insecure people across Sudan, including 1.8 million internally displaced people in Darfur. It will also support, for a six-month period, more than half a million school children in Darfur and around 262,000 in central and eastern Sudan through WFP’s school feeding programme.

“The steadfast partnership between USAID and WFP has saved countless lives in Sudan over the years,” said Jerry P. Lanier, the United States Chargé d’Affaires to Sudan.  “The United States aims to support food security by alleviating hunger, promoting improved nutrition and supporting school feeding programmes.  On behalf of the American people, I would like to thank WFP for its efforts in Sudan.”

The U.S.A. is the single largest donor to WFP Sudan having contributed some US$626  million towards its emergency operation since separation with the South in 2011. In the same period, the U.S.A. has also contributed US$19.8 million towards the United Nations Humanitarian Air Service in Sudan, which is managed by WFP on behalf of the whole humanitarian community.
In 2015, WFP plans to assist 3.7 million people across Sudan through direct food assistance, cash vouchers and nutrition programmes, as well as recovery and resilience-building activities that help communities to become self-reliant. This includes 2.8 million people in the conflict-affected region of Darfur and close to one million vulnerable people in the Central, Eastern and Three Areas, including South Kordofan and Blue Nile states.
 WFP’s work in Sudan began in 1963 in Wadi Halfa where, in order to escape the rising waters of Lake Nasser caused by the construction of the Aswan Dam in neighbouring Egypt, 50,000 Nubians had to be re-settled 1,300 kms further south.  In 2004, WFP launched its emergency operation in Darfur to respond to the needs of those displaced and affected by the conflict in this region.  

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 75 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media  @wfp_mena

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
Amor Almagro, WFP/Khartoum, Tel. +249 183248001 (ext. 2114), Mob. +249 912174853
Abdulaziz Abdulmomin, WFP/Khartoum, Tel. +249 183248001 (ext. 2123), Mob. +249 912167055

 

KHARTOUM – The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) today welcomed a contribution of food commodities from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) valued at US$135 million to help WFP provide assistance in Sudan during the lean season.

646014
04/20/2015 - 07:33
School Meals

The workshop - part of the World Bank’s Systems Approach for Better Education Results (SABER) - was chaired by Ms. Lola Bobohojieva, Deputy Minister of Health and Social Protection and attended by a broad range of people including, Mr. Fathiddin Ismonov, Deputy Minister of Education and Science, Mr Vladislav Kurnushko, Adviser to HE the Ambassador of the Russian Federation in Tajikistan and Representative of the Rossotrudnichestvo, and Mr. Nicolas Oberlin, WFP Country Director. Other participants included representatives from ministries, district education departments, the national Nutrition Institute, Parents Teachers Associations (PTAs) and the private sector.

“This a landmark event, not only to identify all the challenges and opportunities facing Tajikistan in the transition phase to a nationally owned School Feeding Programme, but also to gather meaningful support from all stakeholders in this crucial phase,” said Ms. Lola Bobohojieva, First Deputy Minister of Health and Social Protection and Chairperson of the National Inter-ministerial Council on School Feeding.

The workshop gave participants an opportunity to address some of the challenges of the programme while contributing concrete recommendations for the future. The participants reviewed internationally-recognized quality standards related to the legal framework, institutional capacities, design and implementation of the programme, as well as budgetary aspects and community involvement.

The workshop looked at ways to integrate school feeding in per capita financing scheme for schools; the development of national standards for hygiene and sanitation in educational institutions; and the role of PTAs. The stakeholders’ recommendations on these issues will be reflected in the forthcoming national school feeding strategy and will guide programme adjustments and implementation.

Tajikistan’s school feeding programme is the largest activity supported by WFP in the country. It provides a daily hot lunch to almost 360,000 schoolchildren in over 2,000 schools in rural Tajikistan. The programme started in 1999 with just 5,000 schoolchildren in 33 schools and has since expanded to reach 60 percent of all rural schools in the country in 2015. The Russian Federation has been a major donor to Tajikistan’s School Feeding Programme since 2005 and actively supports the current transition process.

For more information please contact:
Azam Bahorov, Programme Officer, tel. +992 44 6252000 ext 2420, e-mail azam.bahorov@wfp.org
Emma Khachatryan, tel.+992 44 6252000 ext. 2440, e-mail emma.khachatryan@wfp.org
Abeer Etefa, tel. +201 066634352, e-mail abeer.etefa@wfp.org

 

DUSHANBE - Key stakeholders of Tajikistan’s School Feeding Programme, which benefits almost 360,000 schoolchildren with support from the World Food Programme (WFP), have gathered in Dushanbe, to evaluate the current programme, share experiences, address challenges and draft an action plan for the future

645982
04/16/2015 - 11:31
Responding to Emergencies

“We appeal to all warring parties to the conflict to allow us to replenish our food and fuel stocks to save lives,” said Purnima Kashyap, WFP Representative and Yemen Country Director.  

Two weeks of escalating violence have left many Yemenis hungry, trapped inside their cities and villages with food stocks running low. There are also severe fuel shortages, especially in Aden and areas of the capital, Sana’a. The situation is of particular concern because almost half of the population of Yemen is food-insecure, struggling to grow or buy enough food for a normal, healthy life.

 “We have prepositioned food in the last few days before the fighting flared up but we are struggling to reach people due to the deteriorating security situation,” said Kashyap.  

A Comprehensive Food Security Survey carried out by WFP in 2014 found that 10.6 million people, or 41 percent of the population, were food insecure. Of these, 5 million people were found to be severely food insecure and in need of food assistance. It is estimated today, following the escalation of violence, that more than 12 million Yemenis are food insecure.

•    Yemen imports almost 90 percent of its basic food from abroad. WFP is extremely concerned that the impact of traders being unable to import food and move it inside the country will affect people’s ability to feed their families, especially the poor and most vulnerable.

•    In most of the areas worst hit by the conflict, shops and food markets are closed and the supply of food and other essentials has been seriously disrupted.

•    An interagency rapid assessment of the humanitarian situation in Aden showed that access to food is one of the most serious problems in all locations, with shops closed or people unable to leave homes to go to markets. Lack of cooking gas and increasing food prices have been also reported in many parts of the governorate.

•    WFP provided food assistance in the last few days to cover April and May needs to 16,000 refugees, mainly Somalis, in Kharaz camp some 136 kilometres from Aden. WFP has also provided a two-month food ration to over 13,000 people in Mazraq I and III camps, mostly displaced by the earlier conflict in the northern Sa’ada region.

•    After the escalation of the conflict earlier this month, WFP was able to continue cash distributions through the Yemen Post.  WFP provides cash transfers to severely food-insecure households as a ‘top-up’ to monthly cash assistance they already receive from the government.  In Lahj, Marib, and Sana’a, WFP distributed nearly US$1 million in this way to more than 76,000 people.

•    In southern governorates, people face a shortage of wheat flour, the price of which has increased by nearly 40 percent since the start of the wider conflict.

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 75 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media and @wfp_mena

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
Abeer Etefa, WFP/Cairo, Tel. +202 2528 1730 ext. 2600 Mob. +2 010 666 34352
Jane Howard, WFP/Rome, Tel. +39 06 65132321, Mob. +39 346 7600521
Bettina Luescher, WFP/New York, Tel. +1 646 5566909, Mob. +1 646 8241112
Steve Taravella, WFP/Washington DC, Tel. +1 202 653 1149, Mob. +1 202 770 5993

 

SANA’A/AMMAN – The United Nations World Food Programme and partners are distributing food for 105,000 displaced people in the Yemeni city of Aden over the next few days, but the humanitarian agency has warned of the challenges of feeding millions of food-insecure people amid deteriorating security.

645981
04/16/2015 - 10:57

A ceremony held at WFP’s Tanzania Country Office in Dar es Salaam was attended by Mr. Walid Bin Abdulrahman Alzinedi, a delegate from the Ministry of Finance of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and Mr. Wajih Bin Masoud Alotaibli, an attache of Economic and Culture Affairs with the  Embassy of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to the Republic of Tanzania.

The consignment of 54 metric tons of dates arrived aboard MV City of Beijing in March and was immediately dispatched from Dar es Salaam to Nyaragusu refugee camp earlier this month.  Distribution of the dates to the refugees is due to start in May.

“WFP is grateful to Saudi Arabia for this latest contribution of dates to our refugee operation,” said WFP Tanzania Representative Richard Ragan. “The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is a valued and consistent supporter of WFP, having contributed nearly US$4 million towards WFP’s operations in Tanzania since 2006,”

The dates will supplement WFP’s monthly food assistance to refugees which consists of maize meal, pulses, Super Cereal (nutritious porridge), salt and fortified vegetable oil. WFP also provides specialized nutritional support to mothers and young children in the camp.

Nyaragusu camp holds more than 65,000 refugees, mostly from DRC with a small number from Burundi. Tanzania has been hosting these refugees since the early 1990s.
 

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 75 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media

For more information please contact:

Fizza Moloo, WFP/Tanzania, Email: fizza.moloo@wfp.org Mob: +255 784 720022

 

DAR ES SALAAM – The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) today welcomed a contribution of dates valued at US$126,000 from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to support refugees living in north-west Tanzania.

645967
04/15/2015 - 12:51

The new contribution from France will enable WFP to transport and distribute locally-procured food items to assist approximately 45,000 people who may be affected by natural or man-made disasters.

WFP will use the funds to purchase wheat from small-scale farmers and farmers’ organisations where possible and High Energy Biscuits produced in a local factory in Afghanistan’s eastern city of Jalalabad.

“This donation is most welcome not only because it provides life-saving food assistance to people in the critical first 72 hours of an emergency and beyond. It will also help support local farmers and businesses because WFP is purchasing all the food commodities locally, including High Energy Biscuits,” said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s Representative and Country Director in Afghanistan.

 “France applauds WFP’s effective and timely response to humanitarian needs in Afghanistan, as shown during the spring floods in 2014 and the flow of refugees from Pakistan. But in the future, those disasters will be more often the consequence of global warming: climate change should thus remain a concern of the Afghan authorities as much as support for disaster victims,” said Jean-Michel Marlaud, Ambassador of France to Afghanistan.

Local purchase provides WFP with the fastest, most efficient and reliable means of ensuring a stable food pipeline during an emergency response. WFP buys wheat directly from small-scale farmers where appropriate, strengthening Afghan grain markets and small-scale producers’ access to them.

In 2015, WFP Afghanistan plans to assist 3.4 million vulnerable Afghans in all 34 provinces of the country with food assistance through various projects including assets creation, school feeding, vocational skills training, nutrition, cash & vouchers.

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About WFP
WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 75 countries.

WFP has been working in Afghanistan since 1963 with the aim of helping Afghans build a hunger-free future for themselves and their country. WFP food is distributed on the basis of need, without regard for ethnicity, religion or political affiliation.

WFP Afghanistan operates a feedback hotline number and welcomes comments, complaints and feedback regarding the distribution of WFP food assistance. Please call: 0790-555-544

Contact information:
Keiko Izushi, WFP/Kabul, +93(0)706-004-885, Keiko.izushi@wfp.org
Wahidullah Amani, WFP/Kabul, +93(0)706-004-884, wahidullah.amani@wfp.org
Fezeh Hosseini, WFP/Kabul, +93(0)706-004-847, fezeh.hosseini@wfp.org  

 

KABUL – The Government of France has announced a contribution of €400,000 (US$ 424,000) to the World Food Programme (WFP) to assist with emergency response in Afghanistan in 2015. The announcement was formalised at a signing ceremony today at the French Embassy in Kabul attended by high-level representatives from the Government of France and WFP.

 

645872
04/08/2015 - 15:14
Food Security Analysis

The research projects focused on analyzing the link between mobile phone usage and hunger. Their findings will be presented at Netmob Conference for Scientific Analysis of Mobile Phone Data at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology this week.

‘This is a new frontier for humanitarian assistance,”’ says Arif Husain, WFP Chief Economist.  “As agencies begin adopting these new techniques, information collection will become cheaper and faster, making relief programmes much more responsive to the needs of hungry poor worldwide.”

The projects focused on ways in which mobile phone usage data could be analyzed to understand household hunger and vulnerability patterns. These included: a new method for estimating household expenditures on food based on mobile phone spending patterns in Africa; a technique for potentially identifying households for assistance during floods in Mexico based on mobile phone network data; and a method to quantify population mobility patterns in relation to the agricultural and livelihood cycles based on calling patterns in Senegal.

The projects completed by UN Global Pulse and WFP show that real-time information derived from mobile phone usage patterns can help humanitarian agencies pinpoint areas of acute need with a level of speed and precision that have never been achieved before.

“New technologies are leading to an exponential increase in the volume and types of data available, creating unprecedented possibilities for improving humanitarian aid,” said Global Pulse Deputy Director Makena Walker. In particular, “big data” generated by mobile and online communications offers major opportunities to complement more traditional data sources, such as face-to-face surveys and satellite imagery, used by humanitarian agencies. The difference is that call data records offer the opportunity to do analysis in near real-time and at very low cost.
                                                                       
While the big data revolution offers tremendous opportunities, agencies are extremely mindful of the pitfalls that using such information sources implies. “Protecting people’s privacy is of utmost concern as we develop these new approaches,” said Walker.

UN Global Pulse and WFP are appealing to telecommunications companies to join the effort in making this type of information available to the humanitarian community, where it would be used for the common good.  

“We hope that companies, such as mobile network operators, who have this type of granular real-time data will be willing to work with humanitarian agencies to provide access to this information, with due consideration for privacy. This data can save lives," said Husain.

#                              #                                 #

WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 75 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media  

Global Pulse is an innovation initiative of the UN Secretary-General working on big data for humanitarian action and development. Visit: www.unglobalpulse.org.

For more information:  
WFP: Jean-Martin Bauer,  Tel: +39 347 248 7434 jean-martin.bauer@wfp.org
UN Global Pulse: Anoush Tatevossian,  Tel: +646-723-4810 anoush@unglobalpulse.org

 

ROME - The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and Global Pulse – an innovation initiative of the UN Secretary-General – have teamed up to deliver powerful insights into how data from mobile phone usage could support networks in fighting hunger and boosting  humanitarian response efforts.

645867
04/08/2015 - 13:26

WFP received US$6.5 million to deliver life-saving food to 123,000 people in dire need of assistance due to conflict in C.A.R. The contribution will be used to purchase rice, pulses and oil for distributions to displaced people, severely food-insecure families and moderately food-insecure households in conflict-affected zones; it will also enable WFP to purchase corn soya blend flour for programmes that help prevent malnutrition.

WFP also received US$1 million towards the United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operation in C.A.R. In 2015, some 20,000 passengers and 400 tons of cargo are scheduled to be transported to 28 different locations by three UNHAS aircraft.  

“We are highly grateful to the people and Government of Japan, for their welcome contribution and continued commitment to providing humanitarian assistance to families in C.A.R who cannot obtain enough food,” said Mustapha Darboe, WFP Country Director a.i. in C.A.R.  “The contribution to UNHAS supports the entire humanitarian community in reaching remote and dangerous locations in order to respond effectively to an extremely challenging situation across the country.”

UNICEF received a contribution of US$4.5 million from the Government of Japan which will support critical projects to restore health services, and to protect children and women affected by more than two years of violence. In particular, the funding will help re-build health and vaccination services country-wide and prevent a cholera outbreak in endemic areas. A large investment will also be made to support survivors of gender-based violence, provide psycho-social support to 5,000 children and reintegrate 1,000 children released from armed groups.

“We are grateful to the Government of Japan, which has been working hand-in-hand with UNICEF since before the crisis in C.A.R,” said Mohamed Fall, UNICEF Representative in C.A.R. “C.A.R is one of the toughest places in the world to be a child, and we need to invest in the country now to secure a peaceful future for these children. The people of C.A.R. are lucky to have friends in Japan who are committed to achieving this goal.”

“Four years ago, the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami caused unprecedented damage to the northern regions of Japan. We witnessed ‘solidarity’ as many messages of sympathy and various forms of support came from the international community. We expressed our sincere appreciation and now it is time for Japan to show its solidarity through this humanitarian aid to the people of C.A.R., who are suffering severely.” said Kazuhiko Fujita, Charge d’Affaires a.i. of the Embassy of Japan.

Apart from the support to WFP and UNICEF, the Government of Japan is mobilising US$9.85 million for C.A.R. through other international organisations such as United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UNWomen) and the Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict.

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 75 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media  

UNICEF promotes the rights and wellbeing of every child, in everything we do.  Together with our partners, we work in 190 countries and territories to translate that commitment into practical action, focusing special effort on reaching the most vulnerable and excluded children, to the benefit of all children, everywhere. For more information about UNICEF and its work visit: www.unicef.org.
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook

For more information, please contact:
Hiroko Konno, Embassy of Japan/Yaounde, Tel +237 2 2220 6202, info@yd.mofa.go.jp
Sayaka Sato, WFP/Bangui, Mobile +236 72 18 76 97, sayaka.sato@wfp.org
Ryoko Ogawa, UNICEF/Bangui, Mobile +236 70 00 97 50, rogawa@unicef.org

 

BANGUI - The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), have welcomed a contribution of US$12 million from the Government of Japan to provide vital humanitarian relief to the most vulnerable people living in the Central African Republic (C.A.R.).