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Official statements announcing key developments in WFP operations and activities.
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651049
03/29/2017 - 16:41

The appointment was made by United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres and José Graziano da Silva, Director-General of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, after consulting the WFP Board at a special session at WFP’s Rome headquarters.

Welcoming Beasley, Wadhwa said: “Mr. Beasley has outstanding qualifications that would greatly benefit WFP.  The Board looks forward to working with him in close and harmonious collaboration.”

Beasley, Chair of the Center for Global Strategies, was Governor of the state of South Carolina from 1995 to 1999. He won a seat in the South Carolina House of Representatives at the age of 21 while still at university. He will succeed Ertharin Cousin as Executive Director when her five-year term ends on April 4.

Cousin led WFP from April 2012 through a period characterized by an unprecedented number of major emergencies. She said that in conversations before his appointment, Beasley had underscored his commitment to raising resources for WFP at a time when the organization was facing four famines while also working towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goal of ending hunger.

“I was impressed with his understanding of the organization, with his understanding of the Board-approved strategic plan and his support for its implementation under the Board’s leadership,” she said.
She told the Board that she believed it would be favourably impressed by Beasley’s commitment to serving vulnerable people.

Link to view David Beasley’s biography.

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 80 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media  

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
Jane Howard, WFP/Rome, Tel. +39 06 65132321, Mob. +39 346 7600521
Gregory Barrow, WFP/London, Tel.  +44 20 72409001, Mob.  +44 7968 008474
Bettina Luescher, WFP/Geneva, Tel. +41 22 917 8564, Mob. + 41-79-842-8057
Steve Taravella, WFP/Washington DC, Tel. +1 202 653 1149, Mob. +1 202 770 5993
Gerald Bourke, WFP/New York, Tel. +1-646-5566909, Mob.  +1-646 525 9982

 

ROME - The President of the Executive Board of the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), His Excellency Anil Wadhwa of India, has welcomed the appointment of David Beasley of the United States of America as WFP’s next Executive Director.

651042
03/28/2017 - 13:57

Until 2005, WFP implemented projects in China on poverty alleviation as well as post-disaster reconstruction and assisted more than 30 million people. In the late 1980s, WFP operations in China were its largest globally. WFP’s modest investments, coupled with the introduction of new ideas and management experiences in some of the most remote regions , together with long-term integrated planning and investment by China, have brought changes for generations to come. Today, China is becoming an increasingly global player, and its experience in reducing hunger has become an example for countries seeking to replicate that success. With 9 percent of the world’s arable land, China has been able to feed more than 20 percent of the world’s population.

The five-year plan comes after extensive consultation, and reflects the WFP-China Memorandum of Understanding signed in 2016 to strengthen partnership for global hunger solutions and development. It provides a coherent and strategic framework for collaboration to end poverty and food insecurity both in China and in other developing countries.

The Country Strategic Plan will feed in to China’s national priorities and align with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, prioritizing SDG 2,“End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture” and SDG 17, “Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development.”  Under the strategic plan, WFP will facilitate countries’ efforts to “help each other” through South-South and Triangular Cooperation. It will also build a broad range of partnerships, and support the reduction of food insecurity inside China through  boosting capacity and developing small innovative pilot programmes that could be replicated or scaled-up.  

“China has transformed itself over the past three decades, reducing hunger and improving the livelihood for millions of people. WFP could help the Chinese people and share China’s rich experience in an innovative manner,” said Dr. Sixi Qu, WFP China Representative. “WFP is changing the way it works  and has identified a distinctive role which adds value to achieving the SDGs in China by 2030. Our shared vision is that teaching fishing is better than handing out fish.  We want people to not only survive but also thrive.”

The Country Strategic Plan also provides a framework for creating partnerships across all sectors, including government, private sector, civil society, academia, NGOs and the UN agencies, which are vital to translate global aims into local actions.

#                              #                                 #

WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 80 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @WFP_Media and on Weibo and Wechat:  @联合国世界粮食计划署

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
Yiwen Zhang, WFP/China, Tel. +86 10 85325228 ext.5309 Mob.+86 13601169994

 

 

BEIJING - The UN World Food Programme (WFP), working in conjunction with the Ministry of Agriculture in People’s Republic of China and other partners, are embarking upon a five-year Strategic Plan in support of achieving the Sustainable Development Goals 2, a world with zero hunger by 2030.

651035
03/27/2017 - 10:56

“Thanks to this generous and timely donation from the Republic of Korea, we will be able to regularly and systematically measure the food and nutrition security of the most vulnerable people, which significantly improves the relevance, effectiveness and efficiency of humanitarian interventions across Africa,” said Arif Husain, WFP’s Chief Economist.

The funds will be used over the next two years to scale up WFP’s mobile Vulnerability Analysis and Mapping (mVAM) initiative, enabling real-time food security and nutrition monitoring of refugees and internally displaced people in Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Kenya, Malawi, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan and Uganda.

The mVAM initiative uses mobile phone technology to collect data from conflict zones, remote areas, and in rapidly evolving situations. First piloted in 2013 in Somalia and DRC and successfully deployed during the Ebola emergency response, the approach has now been used in 32 countries where WFP works.

In addition to SMS and live calls, mVAM uses Interactive Voice Response (IVR) and two-way communications systems to collect and share data. Looking to new technologies, mVAM is currently testing new methods of remote data collection, such as online surveys, “chatbots” and Facebook’s Free Basics service.

“Korea’s generous support will give marginalized populations a greater voice,” said Jean-Martin Bauer, who leads mVAM. “For WFP to be able to instantly reach thousands of people, and for them to reach us, to tell us if their needs are being met, is a powerful mechanism for accountability – an opportunity to use data for good.”  

#                              #                                 #

WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 80 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media, @WFPVAM and @mobileVAM

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
Arif Husain, WFP/Rome, Tel. + 39 06 6513-2014, Mob. + 39 347 050-3350
Jongchul Park, WFP/Seoul, Tel.  + 82-2-722-7395, Mob. + 82 10-3408-3062
Seokjin Han, WFP/Rome, Tel. + 39 06 6513-3769, Mob. +39 345 060-9707
Jane Howard, WFP/Rome, Tel. +39 06 6513-2321, Mob. +39 346 760-0521

 

 

ROME, ITALY – The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) welcomed a donation of US$6 million from the Republic of Korea that will allow WFP to enhance innovative food security monitoring systems in ten countries in Africa, enabling the organization to hear directly from people in need. The funding was raised through Korea’s air-ticket solidarity levy, which is collected from each international flight passenger departing Korea. Known as the “Global Disease Eradication Fund,” it is part of Seoul’s commitment to ending global disease, poverty and hunger.

651006
03/20/2017 - 14:01

The study found that the average monthly rainfall in the region increased over the last 35 years and that the rainy season is now longer by two months. However, the rains – which now fall from around March to the end of the year – increasingly varied in volumes. This unpredictability was found to undermine agricultural production, thereby threatening to aggravate food insecurity in Karamoja.

Released in Kampala today, the ‘Impacts of Climate Change on Food Security and Livelihoods in Karamoja’ found that temperatures have been rising in Karamoja over the last 35 years.

The rising temperatures threaten to increase the frequency, intensity and duration of heat waves in the region, therefore reducing availability of water for crops and animals. This too undermines food security.

A large majority of people in Karamoja, particularly women, were not aware that changes to the climate had been taking place over decades, the study states. However, most of the people that had perceived changes to the climate had not taken any action to adapt, typically because they did not know how to do so. Where trees were planted as an adaptation measure, the sale of charcoal and firewood were also a common measure that people took in response to climate-related crop failure.

Sponsored by the Swedish Government, the study was carried out in 2016 by the Ministry of Water and Environment with support from the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and the CGIAR Consortium’s Research Programme on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security.

The Uganda Minister for Water and Environment, Sam Cheptoris, said today, “These are significant findings that threaten any hope for Uganda achieving its Vision 2040 and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), if no immediate action is taken.”

Cheptoris said that his Ministry was already calling for a national and regional response, advocating for climate change sensitive approaches across all Government sectors, educating the population about climate change, and undertaking emissions profiles.

“Karamoja’s population is heavily dependent on rain-fed agriculture, which is highly vulnerable to climate change,” said El Khidir Daloum, WFP Country Director for Uganda. “However, little has been known previously about the impacts of climate change on food security, and in particular, the ability of households in the region to adapt.”

WFP hopes that the findings and recommendations of the study will contribute to efforts toward appropriate adaptation measures while helping to identify policies that will safeguard the most vulnerable communities in Karamoja.

The study recommended that the Government and its partners increase investments in water harvesting and agroforestry schemes, education of the people, improved access to climate change information and the cultivation of drought-resistant crop varieties.

Within the Ministry of Water and Environment, the study was carried out by the Climate Change Department and the Uganda National Meteorological Authority.

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For more information please contact:
Chebet Maikut, Acting Commissioner for Climate Change, Minsitry of Water and Environment and national focal person for the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change., tel. 256.414, 237.690

Lydia Wamala, lydia.wamala@wfp.org, tel. +256 312 242 000 or cell +256 772  287 034/758 778 037

 

KAMPALA – A new study carried out by the Government of Uganda and its partners has found a new weather pattern that threatens to worsen food insecurity in the Karamoja region if no action is taken.

651003
03/20/2017 - 10:36

The ships, Maritime Faith and Liberty Grace, docked in Port Sudan and discharged over 47,880 metric tons of sorghum, over 20,000 metric tons of which will be transported through Sudan into South Sudan. In March and April, WFP will receive additional ships carrying 47,500 metric tons of sorghum, more than 5,000 metric tons of lentils and nearly 1,700 metric tons of vegetable oil. The commodities on these ships, also donated by the United States, will feed South Sudanese refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs) within Sudan.

“This food assistance comes at a critical time when continued conflict has resulted in life-threatening hunger in Sudan and famine in South Sudan. The United States and WFP are pleased to be working with the government of Sudan to ensure safe and secure transport of the majority of this assistance to South Sudan,” said US Chargé d’Affaires Steven Koutsis. “We hope to overcome obstacles that impede timely delivery of urgently needed food assistance and urge all parties to allow food and other humanitarian aid to reach those who need it the most.”

The United States continues to be a long-standing partner and the largest single donor to WFP in Sudan, contributing nearly US$1 billion to WFP Sudan’s operations since 2012. These contributions of cash and commodities, including U.S.-grown sorghum, lentils, and vegetable oil, donated by the American people, has enabled WFP to provide critical food assistance to severely food-insecure populations in Sudan in a timely and professional manner.

“WFP is grateful to the United States and the American people for their continued support to our operations,” said WFP Sudan Representative Matthew Hollingworth. “The arrival of these two ships could not have been more timely, given the situation in both Sudan and South Sudan. This again proves the generosity of the U.S. Government and its people, who have always been willing to extend a helping hand to those in need of assistance.”

In 2017, WFP plans to assist more than 4 million vulnerable people in Sudan—IDPs, refugees, climate-affected populations, and host communities—through a range of activities, including emergency food aid, cash-based transfers, nutritional support, and resilience-building activities to help communities become independent.

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About USAID: USAID is the lead U.S. Government agency that works to end extreme global poverty and enable resilient, democratic societies to realize their potential. For more information, please visit: https://www.usaid.gov

About WFP: WFP is the world’s largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 80 countries. Please visit: www.wfp.org or Facebook. Follow us on Twitter

@wfp_media @wfp_mena

For more information please contact:
John Nelson, WFP/Khartoum, Tel. +249 183248001 (ext. 2107), Mobile: +249 912167197, email: john.nelson@wfp.org

Abdulaziz Abdulmomin, WFP/Khartoum, +249 183248001 (ext. 2123), Mob. +249 912167055, email: abdulaziz.abdulmomin@wfp.org

U.S. Embassy Public Affairs, +249 187022000; http://sudan.usembassy.gov; https://www.facebook.com/khartoum.usembassy

 

 

 

 

 

 

PORT SUDAN – The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) through the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), today welcomed the second of two recent shipments carrying urgently required food assistance for Sudan and South Sudan.

651002
03/17/2017 - 16:32
Responding to Emergencies

Japan has allocated approximately US$7.4 million to the emergency operation in response to the famine in the country. WFP will use the funds to purchase more than 24,000 bags of sorghum, a staple food in South Sudan, which will ensure provision of food assistance to more than 17,000 people for three months. In addition, the funds will be used to sustain WFP nutrition support with fortified nutritious foods for three months for 26,000 mothers and 37,000 children facing acute malnutrition.

Japan has also allocated funds to support UNHAS, a vital common air service that WFP manages on behalf of the wider humanitarian community. UNHAS provides air transport and cargo services for 240 humanitarian organizations delivering life-saving assistance in South Sudan. The funding received from the Government of Japan will allow UNHAS to continue flying humanitarian workers to hard-to-reach areas of the country where the needs are most severe.

“During my tenure alone, the food insecurity profile of South Sudanese has become even more dire and widespread,” said HE Kiya Masahiko, Ambassador of Japan to South Sudan, as he appealed for international solidarity to save lives. “Japan’s assistance in food distribution through WFP may be a drop in the ocean, but we stand behind the international efforts to uplift people to minimum nutrition standards.”

“Japan’s generous contribution to WFP comes at a time when hunger is a dangerous reality for nearly half of South Sudan’s population after more than three years of conflict,” said Hakan Falkell, Officer-in-Charge for WFP in South Sudan. “WFP is doing everything it can to reach people facing severe hunger. Monthly food assistance is a lifeline for millions of people, and without support from our partners like the Government of Japan, we would not be able to provide this assistance.”

Japan continues to be a strong supporter of WFP’s response in South Sudan at a time when needs in the country are rising and donor resources are stretched by multiple crises across the world.

WFP still requires additional funding of US$205 million for its food and nutrition operations in South Sudan and an additional US$8 million to continue UNHAS operations in the country over the next six months.

#                              #                                 #

WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 80 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_SouthSudan @wfp_media @wfp_africa

For more information please contact:
Challiss McDonough, WFP/Nairobi (currently in Juba): mobile:+254-707-722-104, challiss.mcdonough@wfp.org
Koji Ito, Embassy of Japan in South Sudan, Juba: Tel: +211 956 481 145, koji.ito-2@mofa.go.jp

 

 

 

 

 

 

JUBA – The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) has welcomed a contribution of US$8.4 million from the Government of Japan to support its emergency response and the WFP-managed United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) in South Sudan.

651000
03/16/2017 - 18:14

“When communities know what assistance they can receive and for how long, it helps them to make the right choices to rebuild their lives after a disaster” explain Ronald Tran Ba Huy, WFP Country Director in Haiti. “WFP broadcast its hotline number on local radio after the hurricane to allow affected people to call to provide feedback or in case they had any questions about WFP’s assistance”.

After Internews conducted an independent assessment of media outlets in Jeremie, Abricot and Latiboliere, areas worst affected by Hurricane Matthew, WFP and Internews found that the majority of Haitians turn to local radio as their preferred way to find key information about the humanitarian response and share news.
“Internews expertise is, and has always been, in amplifying community voices while at the same time providing them the information they need to make informed decisions about their lives,” said Anahi Ayala Iacucci, Internews Senior Director of Humanitarian Programs. “With this project we have been able to reconnect hundreds of people affected by Hurricane Matthew to allow them to access reliable and verified information.”

Four radio stations across Grand-Anse, Sud and Nippes are being rehabilitated and provided with basic power and Information Technology support, equipping them to receive, create and transmit content. Complementing humanitarian efforts in Haiti, community leaders, local authorities and operational agencies will be able to leverage those stations to broadcast coordinated messages on distribution schedules and nutrition, for example, as well as encourage dialogue on pressing issues affecting local communities.

“The radio station in Dame Marie was reaching around 30,000 people with their own makeshift repairs,” said Ben Noble, Internews Country Representative in Haiti. “After rehabilitation, this station can reach an additional 93,000 people, so a total of more than 120,000.”

The community radio rehabilitation project in Haiti is being implemented by Internews, WFP, as global lead of the Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC), and WFP’s Fast IT and Telecommunications Emergency and Support Team (FITTEST).

“Though each disaster is unique, we see that access to vital information in emergencies is an ever-present need and really does mean survival. The work by the ETC and our global partners to restore the community radio stations will enable Haitians to share news and information, as they rebuild their communities and livelihoods” said Enrica Porcari, Chair of the ETC and WFP Chief Information Officer and Director of IT.

Haiti is one of the world’s most disaster-prone countries. Seven years after an earthquake flattened the capital and impacted 3 million people, 2016’s Hurricane Matthew affected 1.125 million people in rural areas along the country’s southern coast, killing more than 500 and destroying livelihoods.

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World Food Programme (WFP) is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 80 countries. www.wfp.org

Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) is a global network of humanitarian, private sector and governmental organisations that work together in disasters to provide vital communications services. The ETC is one of the 11 clusters designated by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC). The ETC seeks to ensure that by 2020, all those responding to humanitarian emergencies – including affected communities – have access to vital communications services. www.ETCluster.org

Internews works to ensure access to trusted, quality information that empowers people to have a voice in their future and to live healthy, secure, and rewarding lives. Internews responds to crises and emergencies around the world to meet information and communication needs of disaster-affected people. Information save lives, reduces suffering and enables people in the midst of a disaster to take an active role in their own survival and recovery. Internews, an international non-profit organization, has worked in Haiti since 2010. www.internews.org

For more information please contact:
Lorene Didier, WFP, Port au Prince: +50938004976, lorene.didier@wfp.org
Anahi Ayala Iacucci, Internews, Senior Director – Humanitarian Programs,  +44 (0) 7375362143 aayala@internews.org

 

HAITI - When Hurricane Matthew ripped through Haiti in October 2016, many communities struggled to recover amid torrential rains, blocked routes and the interruption of radio stations and telephone networks. In addition to humanitarian assistance, people were desperate for something else: access to accurate, useful information. The World Food Programme (WFP) and media development organisation Internews are restoring four community radio stations damaged by Hurricane Matthew, improving their ability to transmit localised humanitarian messages and enabling Haitians to receive critical updates and engage in the recovery of their communities.

650991
03/15/2017 - 12:35
Responding to Emergencies

SANA’A/AMMAN –Severe food insecurity threatens more than 17 million people in conflict-ridden Yemen, according to the latest Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) analysis released by the United Nations and humanitarian partners today.

Twenty of the country’s 22 governorates are in ‘emergency’ or ‘crisis’ food insecurity phases and almost two-thirds of the population are now facing hunger and urgently require life and livelihood-saving assistance.  Without additional humanitarian and livelihoods support, Taiz and Hodeidah, two governorates accounting for almost a quarter of Yemen’s population, risk slipping into famine.

With an estimated 17 million people at ‘emergency’ or ‘crisis’ levels of food insecurity, Yemen is  currently one of the worst hunger crises in the world. These numbers represent a 21 percent increase since June 2016 and underscores the findings of the February 2017 Emergency Food Security and Nutrition Assessment.

Conflict is driving food insecurity

The conflict has had a devastating impact on food security and livelihoods. Almost 80 percent of households in Yemen report having a worse economic situation than before the crisis. The decrease in domestic production, disruption of commercial and humanitarian imports, increasing food and fuel prices, rampant unemployment, loss of income, relatively low levels of funding for UN agencies providing food assistance and the collapse of public services and social safety nets are all factors contributing to a worsening food security situation.

Taiz and Hodeidah, traditionally food producing governorates, have been the focus of intense violence in the two years since the current crisis escalated.
These two governorates have the highest rates of global acute malnutrition in the country, ranging from 17 percent in Taiz City to 25 percent in Hodeidah. The emergency threshold set by the World Health Organization is 15 percent.

“The conflict has a devastating impact on agricultural livelihoods. Crop and livestock production fell significantly compared to pre-crisis levels,” said Salah Hajj Hassan, FAO Representative in Yemen. “It is absolutely essential that the humanitarian response encompass food and agriculture assistance to save not only lives but also livelihoods.”

Stephen Anderson, WFP Representative and Country Director in Yemen said the situation had deteriorated rapidly since the conflict escalated two years ago. “The current dire food security and nutrition situation in Yemen requires significant financial resources to allow immediate, adequate and sustained food, nutrition and other assistance for those in greatest need to prevent a slide into famine,” he said. “Unrestricted access to all areas, including for commercial trade, will also be critical to ensure the food insecurity in the country does not further deteriorate,” he added.

“We are seeing the highest levels of acute malnutrition in Yemen’s recent history. Of the 2.2 million children suffering from acute malnutrition, 462,000 are severely and acutely malnourished (SAM). To put things in perspective, a SAM child is ten times more at risk of death if not treated on time than a healthy child his or her age. The ongoing conflict and food insecurity will have long-term implications on the health and overall development of children in Yemen.” said Dr Meritxell Relaño, UNICEF Representative.

Persistent insecurity disrupts livelihoods

Fighting along the Red Sea coast in recent months has caused extensive damage to Yemen’s largest port in Hodeidah. This has disrupted imports, which account for 90 percent of Yemen’s staple foods. Access restrictions and the loss of boats, nets and other gear, have wiped out fishing - an important source of food and income.  
Insecurity along the coast will likely affect the start of the planting season for sorghum in April - the most important domestically produced cereal. Moreover it will hamper trade, force more people to leave their homes, further limit the availability of food and disrupt livelihoods.

Across Yemen as many as 2 million households engaged in agriculture now lack access to critical agricultural inputs, including seeds, fertiliser and fuel for irrigation pumps. High fuel prices also make irrigation prohibitively expensive.

Because of insecurity, humanitarian access may be soon limited to a few kilometres around main towns, leaving rural communities in dire need of aid.

The United Nations in Yemen reiterates its appeal for all parties to the conflict to facilitate unconditional and sustained access so humanitarian organizations can scale up their assistance to meet the growing demands of people in the most acute need.

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 80 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media and @wfp_mena

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org):
Abeer Etefa, WFP/Cairo, Tel. +2010 66634352
Dina El-Kassaby, WFP/Cairo, Tel. +2010 15218882
Jane Howard, WFP/Rome, Tel. +39 06 65132321, Mob. +39 346 7600521
Bettina Luescher, WFP/Geneva, Tel. +41 22 917 8564, Mob. + 41-79-842-8057
Steve Taravella, WFP/Washington DC, Tel. +1 202 653 1149, Mob. +1 202 770 5993

Lianne Gutcher
Communications Specialist - FAO Yemen
+ 967 730 500 498 (Yemen)
+962 (0) 79 024 8759 (Jordan)
Lianne.Gutcher@fao.org

Rajat Madhok
Chief, Communication & Advocacy
UNICEF Yemen
+967712223001
rmadhok@unicef.org

 

 

Number of people at emergency food insecurity levels increases 20 percent in nine months

650986
03/13/2017 - 16:33
Responding to Emergencies

Cousin also pleaded with the warring parties and authorities in Aden and Sana’a for access to reach hungry people who will die if they do not receive food and nutrition support.

“Humanitarians and aid workers are making a difference in Yemen as they have prevented Yemen from slipping into a famine until now,” said Cousin. “The challenge is that there are areas that are inaccessible where people are severely food insecure. These are the pockets that are at serious risk of people dying of hunger.”

Cousin, who went to Aden and Sana’a on a three-day trip, visited nutrition centres, health facilities and food distributions, where she met families struggling to feed their children.

Yemen, Somalia and northeastern Nigeria are each on the brink of a famine. Last month, famine was declared to be affecting parts of Unity State in South Sudan.

Cousin described the situation in Yemen as heartbreaking.

“The numbers tell us the story, with over 17 million people who are food insecure and approximately seven million people severely food insecure,” said Cousin. “It is a race against time, and if we do not scale up assistance to reach those who are severely food insecure, we will see famine-like conditions in some of the worst-hit and inaccessible areas which means that people will die.”

Despite considerable access challenges, WFP reached a record number of 4.9 million food insecure people in Yemen in February.  Because of inadequate funding WFP reduced the food ration to stretch assistance to more people.

Plans are in place to further scale up to reach all the seven million people who cannot survive without external food assistance but urgently needed resources -- and access by sea and land – is required to reach those people.

One of the women who receives food vouchers from WFP told Cousin, during her visit to a food distribution centre: “We survive now on the WFP voucher and if we do not receive it then we have nothing to put on the table and we will go hungry.” The single woman lives with her father, who had previously received cash assistance as part of the government social safety net programmes, though this support had stopped since last September.

As the poorest country in the region, Yemen has suffered from decades of chronic food insecurity, and the situation has deteriorated rapidly in the last two years due to the ongoing conflict.

“The root cause of the situation in Yemen is a conflict that should end. We cannot address the food security risks in the country efficiently without peace and security,” Cousin added. “We need peace in Yemen.”

WFP appealed for US$950 million to support over seven million people in Yemen this year. Of this, WFP urgently requires nearly US$460 million from March to August to fully cover the food needs of the people it hopes to reach.

Journalist resources:

High-resolution photos are available to download here.

Access streaming video here. For broadcast-quality video contact video@wfp.org.

#                              #                                 #

WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 80 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media and @wfp_mena

For more information please contact:
Abeer Etefa, WFP/Cairo, Tel. +2010 66634352
Dina El-Kassaby, WFP/Cairo, Tel. +2010 15218882
Jane Howard, WFP/Rome, Tel. +39 06 65132321, Mob. +39 346 7600521
Bettina Luescher, WFP/Geneva, Tel. +41 22 917 8564, Mob. + 41-79-842-8057
Steve Taravella, WFP/Washington DC, Tel. +1 202 653 1149, Mob. +1 202 770 5993

 

ADEN/SANA’A – The Executive Director of the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), Ertharin Cousin, who has been visiting Yemen, urged the international community to help prevent a famine by providing resources to meet the immediate needs of the severely food insecure.

650982
03/09/2017 - 17:04

The meals include a carton of milk fortified with vitamins and minerals and a locally-baked date bar, which provide schoolchildren with the nutrition they need to concentrate and learn in class. Through its local partner, WFP has so far distributed school meals to about 15,000 children at 30 schools in Aleppo since the programme began on 5 March.  

The Syrian crisis, soon entering its seventh year, has derailed the educational system in Syria, leaving an estimated 1.75 million children and young people out of school. School meals are a critical component to help bring children back to school in Syria, and ensure every child has access to education, health and nutrition.

 “This is a turning point for children in Aleppo, many of whom haven’t attended school for years because it was simply too dangerous to go outside due to constant fighting,” said WFP Syria Country Director and Representative Jakob Kern. “Now that relative stability has returned to Aleppo, these daily nutritious meals encourage parents to send their children – especially girls – to school and to keep them there.”

WFP has also begun to provide fresh school meals each school day to more than 2,000 children in two schools in Aleppo city. This new programme provides each student with a fresh meal, consisting of a sandwich and piece of fruit or vegetable. The programme employs 20 Syrian women in Aleppo who prepare the meals, which are then distributed by a WFP local partner.
    
In 2014, WFP launched its school meals programme in Syria by providing meals in Tartous, Rural Damascus and Aleppo governorates. By the end of the 2016 academic year, WFP had expanded school meals and reached nearly half a million children across 10 governorates. Until recently, access constraints had prevented the expansion of the programme into some areas.

In 2017, WFP plans to scale up its school meals programme to reach up to 750,000 children across Syria. This is in addition to a programme that plans to provide 50,000 out-of-school children with vouchers.  

Since January, WFP has provided food assistance to tens of thousands of displaced Syrians returning home to formerly conflict-affected areas in Aleppo city. In addition to distributing ready-to-eat rations with staple food items such as canned chickpeas, meat and tuna, vegetables, olive oil, and thyme, WFP is delivering bulk food to public kitchens that distribute hot meals to families in Aleppo each day.

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WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 80 countries.

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To access WFP in Syria in 2016 - Year in Review report click here:
 

For more information please contact:
Marwa Awad, WFP/Damascus, Mob. +963 958 882 900
Abeer Etefa, WFP/Cairo, Tel. +2010 66634352
Dina El-Kassaby, WFP/Cairo, Tel. +2010 15218882
Jane Howard, WFP/Rome, Tel. +39 06 65132321, Mob. +39 346 7600521
Bettina Luescher, WFP/Geneva, Tel. +41 22 917 8564, Mob. + 41-79-842-8057
Steve Taravella, WFP/Washington DC, Tel. +1 202 653 1149, Mob. +1 202 770 5993

 

DAMASCUS – In March, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) began distributing school meals for the first time to Syrian children attending public primary schools in areas in Aleppo city previously inaccessible to WFP and other humanitarian organizations.