Publications
Food for Assets
21 May 2014

The report synthesizes the main findings from evaluations in Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Nepal, Senegal and Uganda that assessed the impact of WFP's food for assets activities and identified lessons on how to improve FFA for livelihood resilience.  The evaluations found that WFP provided important food and employment to people in underserved communities during periods of conflict and natural disaster and built useful assets in the process.  Overall impacts were seen in many areas related to resilience including livelihoods, income-generating opportunities, land productivity and social cohesion.  Improvements in longer term food security were limited. Impacts on women were significant.  The report recommends that food for assets activities be brought into line with current policy and guidance; adequate funding be secured corporately at least for the transition; strategic planning in country offices position food for assets as a resilience and disaster risk reduction measure; WFP strengthen its efforts to provide guidance and support to regional bureau and country offices; two studies be undertaken on food security and gender dynamics; and monitoring systems be revised for better outcome monitoring. 

Emergencies, Refugees and IDPs, Food for Assets, Gender, General Food Distribution, Nutrition, Purchase for Progress, School Meals
19 December 2013

This country portfolio evaluation covered WFP’s portfolio in Uganda from 2009 to 2013 under the 2009–2014 country strategy and assessed: i) alignment and strategic positioning; ii) quality of and factors driving strategic decision-making; iii) performance and results; and iv) appropriateness and added value of the country strategy.

The evaluation found that WFP set an appropriate strategic direction and that activities closely aligned with Uganda’s priorities and policies, as well as needs of vulnerable communities. The portfolio’s shift from emergency towards development was appropriate and the country strategy built on WFP’s strengths in linking relief and development and operating at scale. Work benefiting small-scale traders showed potential. Implementation was however not as coherent as the strategy, with: weak tracking of results and reporting mainly at input/output levels; poor attention to the quality of assets created; inadequate addressing of gender and protection; missed opportunities for strategic partnerships; and consistent shortfalls in deliveries against plans.

The evaluation makes recommendations regarding WFP’s positioning; sustainability; the development of the next country strategy; the quality and performance of resilience, agriculture and market support activities and general food distributions; and staff capacity development on gender and protection issues.

Food for Assets, General Food Distribution, HIV/AIDS, Nutrition, School Meals
3 June 2011

This is the first in a series of four strategic evaluations related to the transition from food aid to food assistance.  The evaluation analyzed WFP’s role in social protection and safety nets, which are increasingly seen as important mechanisms for promoting development.  The evaluation found that WFP is already contributing to social protection and safety nets, especially for some activities.  However, institutionalizing these approaches more broadly within WFP will require changes in WFP’s operations and efforts to build organizational and staff capacity.

Food for Assets, General Food Distribution, HIV/AIDS, Nutrition, School Meals
15 December 2010

This is the first in a series of four strategic evaluations related to the transition from food aid to food assistance.  The evaluation analyzed WFP’s role in social protection and safety nets, which are increasingly seen as important mechanisms for promoting development.  The evaluation found that WFP is already contributing to social protection and safety nets, especially for some activities.  However, institutionalizing these approaches more broadly within WFP will require changes in WFP’s operations and efforts to build organizational and staff capacity.