Publications
Capacity Building, Emergencies, Refugees and IDPs, Food for Assets, Gender, General Food Distribution, Nutrition, School Meals
19 October 2014

This report synthesizes findings of evaluations conducted between July 2013 and July 2014, covering 12 operations with a combined planned value of USD 3 billion (totaling over USD 1.7 billion funded), which targeted 14.3 million beneficiaries a year, were of varying types, durations and sizes and implemented in diverse settings.

The evaluations found all operations cohered well with national and sector policy frameworks. WFP is directly influencing policy and strategy formulation, and increasingly engaging in joint programming. WFP delivered broadly relevant food assistance, with most operations appropriate to overall needs; however, insufficient differentiation in the analysis and planning of some operations compromised planning for specific beneficiary needs. Results were inadequately documented, particularly at the outcome level, mainly because of weak monitoring systems. Evaluations revealed that the full extent of WFP’s achievements – and under-achievements – is not currently reflected in reporting systems. General food distribution, school feeding and nutrition activities delivered well against coverage targets, with weaker performance in food assistance for assets.  Evidence found that WFP served beneficiaries with less food than planned, however. Gender sensitivity was limited.

At the outcome level, WFP made most progress under Strategic Objective (SO) 1 - saving lives. Only limited data were available on SO2 (preventing acute hunger and investing in disaster preparedness and mitigation) and SO5 (capacity-development). Assessment of efficiency and sustainability was shallow; few operations were characterized as generally efficient or potentially sustainable.

External factors affecting results include WFP’s complex operating terrain and funding. Internal factors are symptomatic of an organization in transition, progressing in introducing changes, but with business processes needing to adapt. The lessons presented in this synthesis report aim to support WFP as it becomes increasingly fit for purpose.

Emergencies, Refugees and IDPs, Food for Assets, Gender, General Food Distribution, Nutrition
15 March 2012

This theory-based impact evaluation has been managed jointly by the Offices of Evaluation of, the World Food Programme and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. It uses a mixed-method approach.
It assesses the outcomes and impacts of the food assistance delivered to refugees from the Central African Republic since their arrival in southern Chad from 2002 and draws lessons regarding its contribution to durable solutions for the refugees.
 

Droughts, Emergencies, Floods, Food for Assets, Food Security Analysis, Gender, General Food Distribution, HIV/AIDS, Logistics, NGOs, Nutrition, Procurement
11 October 2010

Chad is a least-developed country with high rates of poverty, food insecurity and malnutrition, and generally low social indicators. WFP has assisted the country in addressing its hunger needs since 1963. Since 2003, it has also assisted a large number of refugees from the Sudan and the Central African Republic, marking a drastic shift in the nature and scale of WFP assistance.  

This report evaluates WFP’s country portfolio – defined as the ten food assistance operations undertaken between 2003 and 2009 – and focuses on three questions: i) How well did WFP position itself strategically and align with government and partner strategies? ii) How did WFP make choices, and how strategic were these? and iii) How did the portfolio perform, and what were the results? The evaluation was conducted by a consultancy firm, with fieldwork taking place in February 2010. 
The WFP portfolio in Chad presents a significantly complex and challenging operating context, and the evaluation is generally positive. WFP operations were aligned with Government policies and partners’ strategies, although WFP could have positioned itself more strategically by using its important analytical work as leverage to influence national discussions of food security issues and government or partner strategies. Weak national capacity and commitment have limited government ownership and WFP’s incentive and ability to work in effective partnership with the Government. Programme choices and implementation options have been bound by external factors, but have also been guided by assessments, corporate policies and – to a lesser extent – the promotion of synergy with partners, notably in eastern Chad. However, the portfolio has generally been viewed and managed as a set of discrete food assistance operations, rather than an integrated portfolio with a clear vision, common goal and strategy. 
The evaluation found that the portfolio performed well, notably in refugee assistance, which made up the bulk of the portfolio. WFP responded quickly and effectively to the initial influx of refugees, and coordinated well with the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees to provide assistance that saved lives and contributed to a significant reduction in malnutrition rates. However, assistance to the Chadian population in the east and the Sahelian zone was judged insufficient given the prevailing food insecurity and malnutrition. Logistics operations contributed to the portfolio’s effectiveness and were performed professionally and efficiently, allowing timely assistance despite the numerous challenges. 
The evaluation recommends developing a five-year strategy for the country office and a management approach that integrates decision-making across the entire portfolio, to allow enhanced cross-fertilization within and among operations. Closer partnership with the Government and main partners through further engagement, integration and coordination is also recommended.
Droughts, Emergencies, Floods, Food for Assets, Food Security Analysis, Gender, General Food Distribution, HIV/AIDS, Logistics, NGOs, Nutrition, Procurement
11 October 2010

 

Chad is a least-developed country with high rates of poverty, food insecurity and malnutrition, and generally low social indicators. WFP has assisted the country in addressing its hunger needs since 1963. Since 2003, it has also assisted a large number of refugees from the Sudan and the Central African Republic, marking a drastic shift in the nature and scale of WFP assistance. 

This report evaluates WFP’s country portfolio – defined as the ten food assistance operations undertaken between 2003 and 2009 – and focuses on three questions: i) How well did WFP position itself strategically and align with government and partner strategies? ii) How did WFP make choices, and how strategic were these? and iii) How did the portfolio perform, and what were the results? The evaluation was conducted by a consultancy firm, with fieldwork taking place in February 2010.

The WFP portfolio in Chad presents a significantly complex and challenging operating context, and the evaluation is generally positive. WFP operations were aligned with Government policies and partners’ strategies, although WFP could have positioned itself more strategically by using its important analytical work as leverage to influence national discussions of food security issues and government or partner strategies. Weak national capacity and commitment have limited government ownership and WFP’s incentive and ability to work in effective partnership with the Government. Programme choices and implementation options have been bound by external factors, but have also been guided by assessments, corporate policies and – to a lesser extent – the promotion of synergy with partners, notably in eastern Chad. However, the portfolio has generally been viewed and managed as a set of discrete food assistance operations, rather than an integrated portfolio with a clear vision, common goal and strategy.

The evaluation found that the portfolio performed well, notably in refugee assistance, which made up the bulk of the portfolio. WFP responded quickly and effectively to the initial influx of refugees, and coordinated well with the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees to provide assistance that saved lives and contributed to a significant reduction in malnutrition rates. However, assistance to the Chadian population in the east and the Sahelian zone was judged insufficient given the prevailing food insecurity and malnutrition. Logistics operations contributed to the portfolio’s effectiveness and were performed professionally and efficiently, allowing timely assistance despite the numerous challenges.

The evaluation recommends developing a five-year strategy for the country office and a management approach that integrates decision-making across the entire portfolio, to allow enhanced cross-fertilization within and among operations. Closer partnership with the Government and main partners through further engagement, integration and coordination is also recommended.